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pamphlet front A pamphlet from the xxx. pamphlet rear

Casebolt property ad

Mail Car

from The Street Railway Journal, November, 1895. Volume XI, Number 11.

New Cable Mail Cars for Third Avenue.

On the first of October eight new mail cars for the Third Avenue line in New York City went into service. These cars are of a design presented to the United States Post-office department by John H. Robertson, superintendent of the Third Avenue Railroad Company, and were built by the J. G. Brill Company. Our illustrations show an exterior view of one of these cars, taken while waiting at the upper end of the line, an interior view, and a plan of the car. The bodies measure twenty feet in length and are twenty-eight feet six inches over all, and are seven feet six inches wide. There are two doors four feet wide, diagonally opposite each other and three windows on each side. The cars are lettered instead of numbered. The ends of the cars are without windows, that space being taken up by the pigeon holes, 380 in number. The platform is occupied only by the brakeman or conductor. These cars are built without grips and are drawn by passenger grip cars.

The interior, as will be seen by a glance at the plan and inside view, is a miniature railway post-office. At each end of the car is a wide assorting table, and on one side is an opening and stamping table, while the opposite side is occupied by a pouch rack, accommodating eight mail bags, and a space for empty pouches. The windows are fitted with brass screens to prevent mail being blown through open windows and for the purpose of safety. Th lighting is by Pintsch gas, three large burners with reflectors being employed. Four gas reservoirs are supported under the center of the car, as will be seen from the perspective view. The cars are heated by steam, the boiler for which can be seen under the platforms with pipes entering the end of the car.

The cars are carried on Peckham trucks and are remarkable for the ease with which they ride and their steadiness of motion. On the trial trip, although just lightly loaded, they were extremely easy even when passing the crossovers at a high rate of speed.

The method in which Mr. Robertson submitted his design to the post-office authorities was unique, and well worthy of attention. By means of a platform elevated on horses at the proper height for a car floor, and a framework of light lathes and scantling, he built what might be called an outline or framework of the car of full size. This enabled the postal authorities to inspect and to a certain extent try the convenience of arrangement of the car. As the tables and passageways were all before them, the location of all the pigeonholes could be seen and the convenience of the arrangement tested. The cost of constructing this full sized model was no greater than that of making a small one to scale, while its advantages were manifestly superior.

Upon the occasion of their maiden trip on Sept. 28, a large company of newspaper men, postal officials and guests from New York City made a trip from Sixth Street to 125th Street and Columbus Avenue in the new cars. The four cars which were used on this occasion attracted great attention and there were crowds along the line during the whole trip. At the Colonial Hotel, 125th Street, refreshments were provided, and the guests of the evening were most hospitably entertained, the hosts being the Third Avenue Railroad Company. Among the invited guests were the postmasters of New York and Brooklyn, some prominent municipal officers, representatives of the Street Railway Journal and other papers.

The service of the new cars is an especially interesting one for New York City, this being the first attempt of the kind made to facilitate the postal service on the island. The success of similar undertakings in other cities, and the enterprise of the Third Avenue Railroad Company in introducing anything that is new and useful, led to the scheme in this case. The service, according to the schedule printed in advance, consists of sixty-eight trips; the first one starting at 1 o'clock in the morning and the last one at 11 P. M. During the period from 5 o'clock in the morning until half-past 8 at night, the cars leave the General Post Office and the upper end of the line at half hour intervals. The present service is so timed as to give nearly twenty minutes' wait for each car at each terminus. The upper end of the road at present is at 187th Street and Amsterdam Avenue.

Mail Car interior

Mail Car plan


Independence Day Arch
"The Great Fourth of July Arch Erected on Market Street Between Third and Fourth." Note the 40-foot long cable car. From the 04-July-1895 San Francisco Call.


Phelps Manufacturing An ad for Phelps Manufacturing. From the 1890 Langley's San Francisco Directory at San Francisco Genealogy, page 13.

California Wire Works An ad for the California Wire Works. From the 1890 Langley's San Francisco Directory at San Francisco Genealogy, page 13.

Babcock and Wilcox An ad for Babcock and Wilcox boilers. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

E Saxton An ad for cable and electric railway contractor Edmund Saxton. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

George Cradock An ad for wire rope manufacturer George Cradock. It includes a testimonial from the Matlock Cable Tramway. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

Brownell An ad for the Brownell Car company mentions the building of the Broadway Cable line in Saint Louis. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

John Stephenson An ad for car builder John Stephenson features a Broadway cable car from New York. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

Pullman An ad for car builder Pullman Palace features a North Chicago cable car. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

Laclede An ad for car builder Laclede features a Broadway cable car from New York. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

Laclede An ad for car builder Laclede features a Third Avenue cable car from New York. From the October, 1895 Street Railway Journal.

AW Wright An ad for AW Wright "Consulting Engineer for Horse Railroads". He also worked on cable railroads. Note that he is to be contacted care of the North Chicago City Railway, where he was superintendant of track and construction. From the April, 1885 Anerican Railroad Journal.

WW Hanscom An ad for San Francisco cable tramway engineer WW Hanscom. From the April, 1885 Anerican Railroad Journal.

LA Thompson An ad for the scenic railway (roller coaster) of LaMarcus A Thompson (no relation). LA Thompson is considered to be one of the inventors of the roller coaster, which shared some technology with the cable railway. Note that one installation was at San Francisco's Midwinter Fair in 1894. From the 28-February-1903 New York Clipper.

SF/1

SF/2

SF ferry

Echo Mountain Car Echo at the top of the Mount Lowe incline.

Lookout Mountain The Lookout Mountain incline.

Cable Car Classic A program from the 1972 Cable Car Classic.

Citizens' Cable Car Committee Card A membership card for the 1947 Citizens' Cable Car Committee.

NBC Wide World In 1963, car 523 carried a television camera for a live appearance on NBC's Wide World program.

Edinburgh Princes Street/National Gallery "Princes Street and National Gallery, Edinburgh." Cable tram 120 approaches the camera on Princes Street. Source: Tramway and Light Railway Society Photographic Archive.

Car 49 Car 49 at California and Stockton. August 2001. Photo by Joe Thompson.

Washington and Georgetown Trailer Eight Wheel Open Car (source: Street Railways: Their Construction, Operation and Maintenance by CB Fairchild).

From A History of California and an Extended History of Los Angeles and Environs, Volume One By JM Guinn, A.M., 1915.

PLAYA DEL REY

Playa del Rey (Beach of the King) was known to the old-timers as Will Tell's. It was a popular seaside resort thirty years ago, where sportsmen went for duck shooting on the lagoon. The southeasters of the great flood year of 1884 destroyed its hunting grounds, and for two decades it was deserted. With the great boom of ocean frontage that began in 1902 the capabilities of the place for a seaside resort were brought to the front and extensive improvements begun. In 1904 fully a quarter of a million dollars were expended. A new pavilion was built at an outlay of $100,000 and was dedicated on Thanksgiving day, 1904.

On the lagoon side, and extending from the level of the pavilion to the water's edge, an amphitheater with a seating capacity of 3,000 was erected. From this a fine view of the boat races and aquatic sports can be obtained. A handsome three-story hotel was erected at a cost of $20,000 and a number of fine residences were erected. During the year 1905 extensive improvements were made at the King's Beach. The lagoon's banks were bulkheaded for miles on either side. Two suspension bridges of concrete were constructed to connect the strand with the mainland, and an incline railway was built from the beach to Mount Ballona, as the eminence is called that rises above the beach. A two-story bank building was constructed, and the Los Angeles-Pacific Electric Railway expended $5,000 in building a passenger depot in the so-called mission design. Gold has been found in the black sands of the beach. It is one of the possibilities of the future that gold mining may be made to pay.

Playa Del Rey advertisement July 16 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development. "An Incline Railway -- Plans and specifications for a unique incline railway to the summit of beautiful Del Rey Height are completed and operations will commence at once. This diminutive road will be a marvel of engineering and will be built under the personal supervision of Mr. A. W. Eager, the well-known architect of the firm of Hunt A Eager. The system will have a double track and will be complete in every detail. The completion of this railway will open to the public the finest seaside property on either coast -- Del Rey Heights. This property positively commands the most extensive panoramic view of sea, valley and mountains of any location on the shores of the Pacific: Catalina, Santa Monica Bay, Redondo, Sherman, Hollywood, Los Angeles and all intervening points may be clearly seen without the aid of a glass." From the Los Angeles Herald, 16-July-1905.

Playa Del Rey advertisement July 21 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development. "An Incline Railway Will Be Built -- Work will commence at once on the building of an incline railway t othe summit of Del Rey Heights. The road will be built under the supervision of architect A. W. Eager and will open to the public the most attractive ocean front property on either street." From the Los Angeles Herald, 21-July-1905.

Playa Del Rey advertisement July 23 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development which mentions the "unique incline railway which will extend to the summit of Del Rey Heights. will be completed in a comparatively short time. Surveyors and graders are now at work preparing the roadbed. The system will have a double track, with pavillions at the summit and foot. An attractive 'midway station' will also be built. This diminutive road will be a marvel of modern engineering, and will open to the public the most picturesque seaside residence property on the Pacific Cost." From the Los Angeles Herald, 23-July-1905.

Playa Del Rey advertisement July 30 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development: "Playa Del Rey Will Be the Only Ocean Resort With an Incline Railway." From the Los Angeles Herald, 30-July-1905.

Playa Del Rey advertisement August 4 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development: "Playa Del Rey Will Be the Only Ocean Resort With an Incline Railway." From the Los Angeles Herald, 04-August-1905.

Playa Del Rey advertisement August 20 An advertisement for the Playa Del Rey development: "Construction work on the great incline railway to the summit of Del Rey Heights is progressing favorably. When completed it will open to the public the most attractive seaside residence property on the Western Coast." From the Los Angeles Herald, 20-August-1905.


15 painted front view Val Lupiz took this front view of freshly painted new car 15. May, 2009. Photo by Val Lupiz. All rights reserved.

15 painted front view Val Lupiz took another front view of freshly painted new car 15. May, 2009. Photo by Val Lupiz. All rights reserved.



United Wrong A beautiful United Airlines ad shows Grant Avenue and California Street in Chinatown. The only problem is, that is a Powell Street cable car climbing the California Street hill. From the wonderful Facebook group Vintage Advertising and Poster Art.
Crossing Sign Cable car crossing sign at Powell and California. January 2002. Photo by Joe Thompson.
Do Not Board Sign Do not board in this area sign at Powell and California. January 2002. Photo by Joe Thompson.


Municipal Transportation Agency (MTA)
Tuesday, August 1, 2000 Meeting Agenda and Minutes
http://www.sfmuni.com/rid_mta/mt000801.htm

General Manager Burns spoke about placing cable car #4 at PacBell Park. Muni retains ownership of the car and the Giants are responsible for relocating and restoring it. Advertising on the car will be done through the TDI contract and some revenue will come to Muni once relocation and restoration costs have been recovered.

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 3 OBEDIENCE TO SIGNS AND STOPPING OR PARKING
SEC. 31.2. DRIVING ON EXCLUSIVE CABLE CAR LANES ON POWELL STREET.

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SEC. 31.2. DRIVING ON EXCLUSIVE CABLE CAR LANES ON POWELL STREET.

Except as to cable cars, Municipal Railway vehicles, and authorized emergency vehicles, it shall be unlawful for the operator of any vehicle to drive on the exclusive cable car lanes on Powell Street between California Street and Sutter Street over, upon or across the cable car lanes or to make any left or U-turn on the exclusive cable car lanes except for passing a disabled vehicle. (Added by Ord. 204-74, App. 4/24/74)

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS

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San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS
SEC. 129.1. SINGLE-ENDED CABLE CARS.

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SEC. 129.1. SINGLE-ENDED CABLE CARS.

On single-ended streetcars propelled by cable, the maximum number of passengers that may ride standing on the right-hand running board is six, and on the left-hand running board the maximum number is eight. No more than two passengers may stand on running boards between each vertical stanchion. (Added by Ord. 65-77, App. 2/18/77)

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS
SEC. 129.2. DOUBLE-ENDED CABLE CARS.

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SEC. 129.2. DOUBLE-ENDED CABLE CARS.

On double-ended streetcars propelled by cable, the maximum number of passengers that may ride standing on each running board is four. No more than two passengers may stand on the running board between each stanchion. (Added by Ord. 65-77, App. 2/18/77)

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS
SEC. 129.3. CABLE CARS-STANDING.

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SEC. 129.3. CABLE CARS-STANDING.

On any streetcar propelled by cable, passengers are prohibited from standing between the forward cabin door and the gripman, in the entryways, on those portions of the running boards forming part of the entryways, and on the prohibited areas of the rear platform of single-ended cars as designated by the Municipal Railway. (Added by Ord. 65-77, App. 2/18/77)

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS
SEC. 129.4. CABLE CARS-SIGNING.

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SEC. 129.4. CABLE CARS-SIGNING.

Every streetcar propelled by cable shall carry legible signs stating the limitation on standing passengers on running boards and a prohibition against passengers leaning out. (Added by Ord. 65-77, App. 2/18/77)

San Francisco Traffic Code
ARTICLE 6 STREETCARS
SEC. 129.5. CABLE CARS-MOVING RESTRICTED.

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SEC. 129.5. CABLE CARS-MOVING RESTRICTED.

Crew members are prohibited from moving a streetcar propelled by cable while the number of passengers or their location in exterior areas are in violation of Sections 129.1, 129.2, 129.3 and 129.4 of this Code. (Added by Ord. 65-77, App. 2/18/77)

San Francisco Administrative Code
APPENDICES INITIATIVE ORDINANCES
APPENDIX 2 REGULATION OF STREET RAILWAY CARS

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APPENDIX 2
REGULATION OF STREET RAILWAY CARS

Adopted May 2, 1935

Providing for the Operation of Street Railway Cars by a Motorman and Conductor, Specifying the Entrance Age of Employees on Street Railways, and Providing a Penalty for Violations Thereof.

Be it Ordained by the People of the City and County of San Francisco:

SECTION 1.

Every street railway car and every cable car while carrying passengers in the City and County of San Francisco, except street railway cars acquired or to be acquired by the City and County of San Francisco subsequent to January 1, 1939, shall be in charge of a motorman or a gripman and a conductor; every motorman and gripman and conductor employed in the operation of any street railway car or cable car must be an adult of not less than 21 years of age.

This ordinance shall not be repealed, modified or amended except by vote of the electorate.

SECTION 2.

Any person, firm or corporation violating any provision of this ordinance shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined for each offense, not less than $50 nor more than $300, or by imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months in the County Jail of the City and County of San Francisco, or by both such fine and imprisonment. (Adopted, 1935; amended, 1954)


Tacoma News Tribune

1938
April 9: The last cable car moves up 11th Street.
June 11: Trolleys in downtown Tacoma are replaced by buses.


Cable road, a railway on which the cars are moved by a continuously running endless rope operated by a stationary motor.
Websters Revised Unabridged Dictionary 1913, Page 203, available at Bibliomania


CSH Cross Section of a Clay Street Hill car. From Smith?


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Last updated 01-November-2016