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The San Diego Trolley

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The Phantom Cable Car Line

Former Muni employee Emiliano J Echeverria has written this article based on his research into the history of transit in San Francisco. He is the Music Director of KPFA-FM in Berkeley.

Did you know that a cable car line was built, that never ran? In San Francisco? And that a piece of it still exists? 'Tis true and Hilton doesn't mention it! It was franchised to the City Railroad, a horsecar line that never ran cable cars, in December, 1890. The line was built the following year, 1891. And then nothing happened. Cars were built, but remained at the factory. The City Railroad was, by this time, controlled by the Market Street Cable Railway. The line ran from 14th and Mission via Mission, West Mission (Otis), Potter (12th Street), Page, Masonic, and Frederick Streets to 1st Avenue (Arguello Boulevard). The line lay unused until it was electrified on August 23, 1894, becoming the new Market Street Railway's first trolley operation.

The line eventually became part of the 6 Masonic trolley line, and was eventually converted to trolley coach in 1949.

The cars, built by O'Brian & Sons in 1890, went to the Metropolitan Railway, (electric) and were rebuilt for that use. One of these cars was rebuilt twice: 1900 and 1913. This is the surviving "piece". It is now Muni car 0109, and it was a rail grinder from 1913 until the 1980's, and is now on loan to the Western Railway Museum, at Rio Vista Junction. The car built as a cable car that never ran as a cable car is so modified as to be unrecognizable, except for its floor dimensions: 23' x 8"6".

The foregoing copyright 2000 by Emiliano J. Echeverria, All Rights reserved. Used by special arrangement for the Cable Car Home Page.

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Private Funiculars

Lauren Weinstein
"Professor Neon's TV & Movie Mania"
http://www.professorneon.com

Outer Limits
"The Duplicate Man"

Paul Ward:
"There are several private funiculars in the Silver Lake neighborhood, and until three or four years ago, there was a wonderful funicular at Forest Lawn Cemetery. It was built by the boss in the twenties, because whenever he drove through the gates in the morning, the guard alerted the staff to stop their partying and debauchery and get to work. The manager's house was at the end of a cul-de-sac in Glendale below the cemetery, and when he had the funicular built, he could ascend the grade and coast down the road to his office in his Locomobile, without the staff knowing of his approach. He was then able to catch them in their laziness.

"The funicular is still there, but the car is gone, and the cable house has been sealed up in concrete. As I said, there are three or four private funiculars left in Silver Lake. John Heller, VP of the ERHA may have a hint as to their location, and I have :cc'd him on this e-mail."

Ray Long:
"And while you're at it, don't forget the three private funiculars on Catalina Island. Also, there was one used for construction of the geodesic dome house in Hollywoodland and one above Hollyridge Drive same canyon. Laurel Canyon had a couple at one time or another. All of them I believe are now among the missing. The dome house was demolished after Buckminister Fuller died."

LAPRY@aol.com
"The round hillside house is (still) perched on the San Fernando Valley side of the Hollywood hills above roughly the area defined by Studio City and Sherman Oaks. I'm not sure if the funicular railway is still operating, but I think that it would be extremely difficult to access the building without it. It was built, I recall, in the 1960s, and allows a breathtaking view of the Valley."

David McCanne

Lauren Weinstein:
"Yes, that's definitely the one -- the photo at: http://www.usc.edu/dept/architecture/shulman/image_collection/Malin.html confirmed it instantly. If it was built in the 60's it must have been almost literally brand new when OL used it for their shoot early in that decade. Thanks very much Joe and John. And also please thank David McCanne for me. Next time I'm out that way, I'm going to take a look! Thanks again."

Ray Long:
"I have been led to believe that there are (present tense) three private funiculars on Santa Catalina Island. They are supposedly little more than inclined elevators for access to private homes."
"Regarding the two in Hollywoodland. On the west side of the canyon, there was an incline used to haul construction materials up to the non-extinct geodesic dome house on the west side of the canyon. One of the houses on the east ridge had an incline of sorts from Hollyridge Drive to the top of the hill. I haven't been up there in 30 years so I don't know the status today.
"There were a couple more in Laurel Canyon. These private inclines were stretching the definition of the words "incline" and "permanent" but they were private and were used as incline elevators or dumb waiters."

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Gravity Power

Mount Tamalpais and Muir Woods Railway Gravity Cars

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Porte Dorée Thank you to Michel Azema, proprietor of Funimag, for pointing out Porte Dorée beer. Learn more here.


Kansas City Cable Railway puzzle Artist Bob Pettes created this wonderful puzzle which depicts a cable train and powerhouse of the Kansas City Cable Railway. January, 2017 Picture of the Month.

Kansas City Union Depot Kansas City Union Depot.


Cable Bonds from the New York Sun, 20-September-1895. No thumbnail.


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  • Inventor Olson Insane (The San Francisco Call, Friday, January 24, 1896)

    Inventor Olson Insane

    From the San Francisco Call / Friday, January 24, 1896. Page 2.

    I'm looking for other references to this poor guy. His claims may be exagerrated.

    Inventor Olson Insane.

    CHICAGO, Ill., Jan. 23. -- M. Olson, who was master mechanic and inventor in the employ of the Chicago City Railway Company for a dozen years, was adjudged insane in court to-day. He invented the grip-car which is now in use on the cable systems as well as many other valuable street-railway equipments which be neglected to have patented. In 1893 he invented a car truck which is now in extensive use. He superintended the construction of the Metropolitan Street Railway of Kansas City, Mo.

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  • Peoples' Cable Railway Seized by Sheriff (Sedalia Weekly Bazoo, Tuesday, September 24, 1889)

    Peoples' Cable Railway Seized by Sheriff

    From the Sedalia Weekly Bazoo / Tuesday, September 24, 1889. Page 3.

    A Cable Road Seized by the Sheriff.

    Kansas City, Mo., Sep. 18 -- At 9:30 o'clock to night the engine of the People's Cable Railway, at Tenth street and Euclid avenue, was seized by the Sheriff under a writ of replevin sued out by Hoover & Co of Hamilton, O., to secure a debt of $4,000 owned by the cable railway company on a Hamilton Corliss engine purchased a year ago at the cost of $7,000. The engine was stopped and as the company refused to call its cars in they were left standing along the line of the road, where they will remain until the case is disposed of. The company claims that the only recourse of Hoover & Co. was in a plain suit on account, as the time for filling (filing? - JT) a lien had expired. The suit was brought at this time, as the road will to-morrow be turned over to the bondholders, who will pay off the indebtedness or $110,000. It is said that the People's company will not only resist the claim of Hoover & Co, but will sue the Sheriff on his bond for damages.

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  • Peoples' Cable Railway Back in Business (Ste-Geneviève, Missouri Fair Play, Saturday, September 28, 1889)

    Peoples' Cable Railway Back in Business

    From the Ste-Geneviève, Missouri Fair Play / Saturday, September 28, 1889. Page 1.

    Resumed Operations.

    The People's Cable railway of Kansas City, the engine of which was stopped by the sheriff, who took possession of it on a writ of replevin sued out by Hoover & Co., of Hamilton, O., the manufacturers, to secure a debt of $4,000, has resumed operations again. Before doing so, however, the People's company gave a bond to produce the engine when the case is called for trial. The road had remained idle twenty-two hours, and it might not be running now if it were not for a clause in its charter which renders it liable to forfeiture if the cars are stopped for twenty-four hours. The directors met in Chicago nnd ratified a resolution passed by the stockholders September 7, by which they turn the road over to the bondholders of Chicago and Cincinnati, who will assume the indebtedness of $llO,OOO. Several chunges in the officers of the road will be made. The officials of the People's company persist in their statement that they will sue Hoover & Co. for damage.

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  • Peoples' Cable Railway at Auction (Portland, OT Beaver Herald, Thursday, June 20, 1895)

    Peoples' Cable Railway at Auction

    From the Portland, OT Beaver Herald / Thursday, June 20, 1895. Page 1.

    Cable Line at Auction.

    Bondholders of the Tenth Street Line In Kaunas City Tired of Their Burden.

    Kansas City, Mo., June 15. -- L. C. Krauthoff, attorney for the bondholders of tho People's Cable railway, better known as the Tenth street line, has asked Judge Philips in the United States circuit court for an order authorizing the sale nt auction of the property. The property embraces a big power house and shop at tho corner of Tenth street and Euclid avenue and the cablo line running on Tenth street from Main street to Brooklyn avenue, and south on Brooklyn avenue to Twenty-seventh street. The debt of the road Is nearly $1,000,000, in round numbers, nnd its net revenue is said never to have been sufficient to pay the interest on the bonds. It is usually from $6,000 to $12,000 behind at the close of each year's business.

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  • Peoples' Cable Railway Sold at Auction (Omaha Daily Bee, Sunday, March 15, 1896)

    Peoples' Cable Railway Sold at Auction

    From the Omaha Daily Bee / Sunday, March 15, 1896. Page 6.

    from TELEGRAPHIC BRIEFS.

    The People's Cable railway, built in Kanpas City during boom days at a cost of $750,000, was sold Saturday at auction for $185,000.

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  • Gripmen Need Protection (Kansas City Journal, Saturday, February 18, 1899)

    Gripmen Need Protection

    From the Kansas City Journal / Saturday, February 18, 1899. Page 12.

    MUST HAVE NEW GRIPS.

    Street Railway Men Say They Cannot Protect Grlpmen With the Appliances Now In Use.

    In referring to the bill recently introduced In the Missouri legislature compelling street railway companies to protect their motormeen or gripmen, Manager Walton Holmes, of the Metropolitan system said yesterday:

    "If they will show us a way In which we can protect our grlpmen from-the wlnd and storm we will gladly adopt it and save them the trouble of compelling us. As a matter of humanity we have tried, and are anxious to find some plan by which we can save our employes some of the exposure to which they are now subject. In our electric cars the problem is not a dlfficult one, and as a proof of what I just said I call attention to the fact that when the law was first introduced to put vestibules on electric cars, our cars were already supplied. All our electric cars are ordered with vestibules and would be, with or without the law. As will be remembered, we tried a grip car with windows and the objections to it were manifold. The grip has to take the brunt of the rough usage and on those the windows were soon shattered. The opening In the bottoms of the cars kept the gripmen's feet as cold as they get in an open car while the warm air collecting above Increased the discomfort of his work. On severe days the windows covered with frost so that it was Impossible to see the track ahead and along the sides, both of which a gripman must do to have control of his car. Our steep grades Increase the need of having an unobstructed view, for a window, though clear, would sometime command only a view of the sky and at other times, of a few feet of track at the lower angle of a grade. On some cable cars, where the ground is level, a screw grip Instead of the long lever we have to work with here, Is used. With this it Is no more difficult to protect the grlpman than it is-a motorman. He can stand near the window at all times and get a good view ahead and on both sides."

    Mr. Holmes further said that In Chicago, from which place he has just returned, the operators of the cars worked through all the terrible cold, without protection either on cable or electric trains. Kansas City, he said, makes a better showing than almost any other town In the amount of protection given street railway trainmen.

    General Manager W. H. Lucas, of the Brooklyn Avenue Railway Company, made substantially the same answer as Mr. Holmes to the reference to the proposed law.

    "If the way can be found," he said, "the law will not be necessary. The matter has long had our earnest consideration. There is no class of outdoor workers who require the nerve to stick to their posts of duty more than the grlpmen. They deserve every bit of the sympathy and more than the honor they get for the way they stand in the cold ten hours every day no matter what comes. A different grip may be devised but, with the present one, windows could not be depended on to give a sufficient view of the track and street. The problem will be largely solved in the change from cable to electricity which is going to be a popular one."

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  • x (x, Wednesday, December 22, 1886)

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    From the San Francisco Call / xday, October 11, 1895. Page 5.

    MUST HAVE NEW GRIPS.

    Street Railway Men Say They Cannot Protect Grlpmen With the Appliances Now In Use.

    In referring to the bill recently introduced In the Missouri legislature compelling street railway companies to protect their motormeen or gripmen, Manager Walton Holmes, of the Metropolitan system said yesterday:

    "If they will show us a way In which we can protect our grlpmen from-the wlnd and storm we will gladly adopt it and save them the trouble of compelling us. As a matter of humanity we have tried, and are anxious to find some plan by which we can save our employes some of the exposure to which they are now subject. In our electric cars the problem is not a dlfficult one, and as a proof of what I just said I call attention to the fact that when the law was first introduced to put vestibules on electric cars, our cars were already supplied. All our electric cars are ordered with vestibules and would be, with or without the law. As will be remembered, we tried a grip car with windows and the objections to it were manifold. The grip has to take the brunt of the rough usage and on those the windows were soon shattered. The opening In the bottoms of the cars kept the gripmen's feet as cold as they get in an open car while the warm air collecting above Increased the discomfort of his work. On severe days the windows covered with frost so that it was Impossible to see the track ahead and along the sides, both of which a gripman must do to have control of his car. Our steep grades Increase the need of having an unobstructed view, for a window, though clear, would sometime command only a view of the sky and at other times, of a few feet of track at the lower angle of a grade. On some cable cars, where the ground is level, a screw grip Instead of the long lever we have to work with here, Is used. With this it Is no more difficult to protect the grlpman than it is-a motorman. He can stand near the window at all times and get a good view ahead and on both sides."

    Mr. Holmes further said that In Chicago, from which place he has just returned, the operators of the cars worked through all the terrible cold, without protection either on cable or electric trains. Kansas City, he said, makes a better showing than almost any other town In the amount of protection given street railway trainmen.

    General Manager W. H. Lucas, of the Brooklyn Avenue Railway Company, made substantially the same answer as Mr. Holmes to the reference to the proposed law.

    "If the way can be found," he said, "the law will not be necessary. The matter has long had our earnest consideration. There is no class of outdoor workers who require the nerve to stick to their posts of duty more than the grlpmen. They deserve every bit of the sympathy and more than the honor they get for the way they stand in the cold ten hours every day no matter what comes. A different grip may be devised but, with the present one, windows could not be depended on to give a sufficient view of the track and street. The problem will be largely solved in the change from cable to electricity which is going to be a popular one."

  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Union Cable Railway Not Being Sold (Kansas City Daily Journal, Thursday, July 07, 1895)

    Union Cable Railway Not Being Sold

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Thursday, July 07, 1895. Page 6.

    from Court Notes.

    The property of the inactive Union Cable Railway Company was not sold at sheriffs sale in front of the court house yesterday afternoon, as intended, the proceedings being stayed by nn order from Judge Henry's division of the circuit court, extending the date of the sale sixty days. M, M, Broadwell secured the postponement by alleging that his wife had various interests in the property that would suffer If the property was sold at forced sale.

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  • Union Cable Railway May Come Back (Topeka State Journal, Thursday, June 11, 1896)

    Union Cable Railway May Come Back

    From the Topeka State Journal / Thursday, June 11, 1896. Page 3.

    TO REVIVE A RAILWAY.

    Melville E. Stone and Others to Build Up the K. C. Union Cable Line,

    Kansas City, June 11. -- President Melville Stone of the Associated Press, accompanied by several capitalists of Chicago, will be in Kansas City today. His errand is said to be connected with a revivification of Mr. E. Broadwell's Union Cable railway.

    This street railway was built to tap the northeastern part of Kansas City, a region which is stiil without adequate street car facilities. When completed, however, not only did the "shallow conduit" system prove a mechanical failure, but the financial vicissitudes of the enterprise culminated in bankruptcy. Since then the roadbed and powerhouse have been severely dealt with by time and lack of attention and look like a wreck.

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  • Union Cable Railway To Be Sold (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, September 15, 1896)

    Union Cable Railway To Be Sold

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, September 15, 1896. Page 3.

    CABLE LINE TO BE SOLD.

    Special Judge Lucas Orders the Sale of Union Cable Railway Assets.

    Attorney W. H. Lucas, acting as special judge in Judge Henry's division of the circuit court, ordered the sale of the assets of the Union cable railway, together with its franchise, yesterday. Mr. Lucas ordered the payment of $500 to William Weston for each vear he has spent as receiver of the road. The arguments and testimony which led up o Mr. Lucas' decree yesterday were heard by him last June. The Union cable railway was a boom enterprise. It was to have laid track around the block bounded by Oak, Sixth, Walnut and Missouri avenue, but It never did so. The tracks it did lay were laid from Missouri avenue and Oak street to Fifth street and thence east to the city limits. The project was abandoned during the boom and the property and rights of the company have been in litigation ever since. No date has been fixed by Attorney Lucas for the sale. Whether the road still owns its franchise is a mooted question.

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  • Kanasas City New Street Railway (Kansas City Daily Journal, Saturday, July 17, 1897)

    Kanasas City New Street Railway

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Saturday, July 17, 1897. Page 4.

    A NEW STREET RAILWAY.

    The building of an electric street railway to the East bottoms within the current year will be one of many enterprises that mark the present revival of prosperity in this city. There is considerable satisfaction in the emphatic announcement that this line will be built. It will give direct connection to a part of the city that has been retarded in the matter of securing street railway facilities. One of the most promising of the undeveloped resources in and about this great commercial center is the East bottoms, with their abundant switch facilities, water supplies and other advantages for the establishment and operation of great manufacturing plants. The scope of these lands is so large as to afford ample room for the building of any number of small dwelling houses near to the great factories that will undoubtedly occupy this territory in the Greater Kansas City.

    But the particular satisfaction in the present undertaking is that it promises to be a finally successful solution of a problem that has had many experimental attentions. The old Fifth street dummy line was never completed to its proposed destination, and lacking transfer privileges it was unsuccessful as an independent short line and had to be abandoned. Its franchise having been annulled only the other day for non-operation. Then the Union cable railway, which was to have an uptown terminus somewhere near Seventh street and Grand avenue, was partially laid when the collapse of the boom suspended operations. The aim of this line was substantially the same as that of the road about to be built. Its eastern terminus having been designated as Helm's brewery.

    With the transfer concessions secured from the Metropolitan company there can be little doubt but that the new road will be a profitable as well as a useful one.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Saturday, December 01, 1898)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Saturday, December 01, 1898. Page 7.

    Must Repair the Viaduct.

    Union Cable Railway Company Must Fix Fourth Street Viaduct or Tell Court Why.

    The case of the old Union Cable Railway Company will be tried in police court to-day. The officers of this company were arrested a month ago for failing to repair and make secure the old viaduct on Fourth street between Harrison and Gllliss streets. The structure has been unsafe for a long time and the building inspector has tried every means within his power to have it repaired.

    The ownership of the road has been in dispute for some time. An almost endless amount of litigation has resulted and the officers of the company under arredt do not seem to know exactly where they are at." However, the building inspector is determined to have the structure torn down or made secure.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Kanasas City Street Railways (Kansas City Daily Journal, Tuesday, January 01, 1897)

    Kanasas City Street Railways

    From the Kansas City Daily Journal / Tuesday, January 01, 1897. Page 20.

    A COMPLETE SYSTEM.

    STREET RAILWAY FACILITIES OF KANSAS CITY ARE GOOD.

    EXTENSIVE AND FAR REACHING TRANSFER SYSTEM.

    The Metropolitan Company Made Great Strides Forward During the Year -- Many Notable Extenaions Already Planned.

    As regards her street railway facilities Kansas City stands among the few cities of the first class In the United States. There is not a point within the city limits, from which, within a few minutes' walk, a person cannot reach a street railway. From the eastern city limits, for a 5 cent fare, a passenger can ride to any point in Kansas City, Kas., or even beyond, several miles to Argentine, for the one fare. There are over 150 miles of street railway track in Kansas City and adjoining cities to-day. While this mileage has not been increased during the last year, a vast amount of capital has been expended In improvements both to the roadbeds and the rolling stock.

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  • Death of Joseph Doyle (Idaho Semi-Weekly World, Tuesday, April 06, 1886)

    Death of Joseph Doyle

    From the Idaho Semi-Weekly World, Idaho City, Idaho Territory / Tuesday, April 06, 1886. Page 4.

    Joseph F, Doyle, the newsboy injured on the Sutter street cable line last Saturday afternoon, died on Monday. Mr. Doyle, the boy's father, a strong, able-bodied longshoreman, was completely prostrated, and his frame shook with emotion, and the large tears coursed down his checks as he told how, when he warned Joe of approaching death, the little fellow muttered, "I can't die yet, father, for where is the money to bury me?"
    [Ex. (San Francisco Examiner - JT)

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  • x (x, Wednesday, December 22, 1886)

    x

    From the San Francisco Call / xday, October 11, 1895. Page 5.

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  • Carpenter Killed (Douglas Independent (Roseburg, Oregon), Saturday, August 30, 1879)

    Carpenter Killed

    From the Douglas Independent (Roseburg, Oregon) / Saturday, August 30, 1879. Page 1.

    PACIFIC COAST.

    San Francisco Items.

    This afternoon, Michael Rochfort, a carpenter, working on an engine house being built on the corner of Geary and Buchanan streets, for the Geary street cable road, was struck on the head by a falling derrick and instantly killed.

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  • GSPO Will Not Issue Tickets (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Thursday, February 19, 1880)

    GSPO Will Not Issue Tickets

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Thursday, February 19, 1880. Page 2.

    San Francisco Items.

    The Geary-street Cable Railroad Company will not issne any tickets, but collect cash for its fares, taking, however, the tickets of other roads from passengers and selling them at the main office. The Omnibus Company is also contemplating the abolishment of tickets. The Sutter street Company does not propose any change in this respect, and the California street Company is positively opposed to it.

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  • GSPO Accident (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Saturday, August 20, 1881)

    GSPO Accident

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Saturday, August 20, 1881. Page 1.

    San Francisco Items.

    Miscellaneous.

    On the Geary-street cable road W. G. Overend, of Vallejo, was on Thursday trying to jump on a dummy, when he missed the step and fell and a car wheel passed over his right foot and ankle. His leg had to be amputated.

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  • x (x, Wednesday, December 22, 1886)
  • GSPO Superintendent Dead (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Wednesday, July 12, 1881)

    GSPO Superintendent Dead

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Wednesday, July 12, 1881. Page 3.

    Death of a Prominent Citizen.

    San Francisco, July 11th.-- The death of Reuben Morton, President of the Central Railroad Company and Superintendent of the Geary-street Cable Railroad, is announced as having taken place at Chicago last Sunday evening. Mr. Morton has been for a long time an invalid without hope of recovery. He left the city some months ago, however, in hopes of obtaining relief by change of air and medical treatment. Deceased was a native of Gorham, Maine, and was aged 62 years. He came to San Francisco in 1850 in the bark Lennox, from Boston. He spent a time in the gold mines of the State, but subsequently engaged in the draying business in the firm of J. Morton & Co. Several years ago he retired from the firm in question, and became more particularly interested in the Central Street Railroad Company as Superintendent, and of which he afterward became President. He was also elected Superintendent of the Geary-street Cable Railroad immediately after its organization. Deceased leaves a wife but no children. The remains are on their way to this city for interment.

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    GSPO Superintendent Sick

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Friday, July 15, 1881. Page 3.

    San Francisco Items.

    Miscellaneous.

    Reuben Morton, Superintendent of the Geary-street Railroad, is lying dangerously ill at San Rafael.

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  • GSPO Superintendent Dead (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Wednesday, July 12, 1881)
  • GSPO Superintendent Sick (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Friday, July 15, 1881)
  • GSPO Lawsuit (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Saturday, May 3, 1884)

    GSPO Lawsuit

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Saturday, May 3, 1884. Page 8.

    San Francisco Items.

    Miscellaneous.

    Susan Kloss and Leopold M. Fabry have entered suit in the Justices' Court to recover $220 damages from the Geary-street cable road, for having caused the death of John Kloss, the carpenter, who died on the 30th of last March from injuries received by being run over by one of the company's dummies a week prior to his death. Fabry is guardian for two of Kloss' children, who are minors.

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  • GSPO Collision (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Friday, March 27, 1885)

    GSPO Collision

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Friday, March 27, 1885. Page 2.

    San Francisco Items.

    Wednesday evening a bobtail car had an encounter with a dummy of the Geary street cable line, and, as might be expected, the bobtail car was knocked out. No one was hurt.

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  • GSPO Death (Sacramento Daily Record-Union, Tuesday, June 23, 1887)

    GSPO Death

    From the Sacramento Daily Record-Union / Tuesday, June 23, 1887. Page 4.

    San Francisco and Vicinity.

    James Frazer, a boy, was mangled and killed by a Geary-street cable dummy Tuesday night.

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  • GSPO Changes (San Francisco Call, Friday, December 12, 1890)

    GSPO Changes

    From the San Francisco Call / Friday, December 12, 1890. Page 6.

    Amended Articles.

    The Geary-street, Park and Ocean Railroad Company has filed amended articles of incorporatlon in the office of the County Clerk.
    Directors -- Charles Main, Reuben Morton, Samuel C. Bigelow and Andrew J. Gunnison, of San Francisco, and Cnarles F. MacDermot, Thomas R. Hayes and Arthur W. Bowman, of Oakland. Capital stock, $1,000,000. of which $10,000 has been subscribed. The amendment concerns the extension of the road.

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  • San Francisco Street Railroads (San Francisco Daily Alta California, Tuesday, March 8, 1887)

    San Francisco Street Railroads

    From the San Francisco Daily Alta California / Tuesday, March 8, 1887. Page 1.

    East Street is now the Embarcadero. Dupont Street is now Grant Avenue. Central Avenue is now Presidio Avenue. Point Lobos Avenue is now Geary Boulevard. Most of the new lines discussed were not built, or were built in a different form.

    CITY STREET RAILROADS.

    Pacific Improvement Company Secures Three Franchises.

    ANOTHER CABLE TO THE MISSION.

    The Geary-street Cable to be Extended Along Point Lobos Avenue to the Cliff House -- Authentic Statement from C. F. Crocker.

    The various rumors which have of late circulated relative to the transfers of large blocks of the capital stock of the Geary-street, Park and Ocean Railroad Company, the City Railroad and the Central Railroad are now quieted by the authoritative statement made yesterday by Colonel C. F. Crocker and Timothy Hopkins. The controlling interests In the roads mentioned have been secured by the Pacific Improvement Company. While negotiations were pending to effect the above result the parties interested would make no official confirmation or denial of the conflicting rumors agitating the street. To an Alta reporter yesterday Colonel Crocker said the purchases had been made in pursuance of a determination arrived at last Summer br Messrs. Charles Crocker, C. P. Huntington and Senator Stanford

    "They have," said Colonel Crocker, referring to the gentlemen just named," the greatest confidence in the future of San Francisco, and look upon the franchises purchased as among the most valuable privileges in the city. The lines ran through the most thickly settled portions of the city, and two of them will afford additional routes to the Golden Gate Park. The Mission district is growing rapidly with fair promise of still greater growth, and it is obvious that the Valencia-street cable service will soon be inadequate to meet the requirements of that section of the city. The first step in all probability will be to construct a cable line along East street from the ferry to Mission and thence along Mission to Thirty-first avenue. The Dupont and Sutter streets portion of the City railroad will probably be operated in connection with the Fifth street line. In regard to the future operation of the Central railroad, that is something not yet determined on, nor how much of the Turk and Sixth street branches will be converted into a cable system. The Turk street route can not be operated as a cablo line clear down to the ferry until the pressure on the Market street cable is somewhat relieved.

    The Geary street, Park and Ocean lines will be operated as at present. A cable line will be run from Central avenue to the Cliff, along Point Lobes avenue. Just what system of transferring passengers will be put In force has not yet been considered. We are not negotiating for the purchase of the Sutter street road, and have no intention of doing so. Its purchase does not figure in any way in our plans."

    The franchise of the City Railroad was granted or supplemented November 28, 1879. The route is as follows : Commencing at Market and East, along East to Mission, along Mission to West Mission, thence to Twenty-sixth street, thence from the inteisection of Mission and Twenty-sixth streets in a southerly direction along and upon Mission street and Mission-street road to Courtland avenue. Second -- Commencing at the intersection of Mission and Fifth streets, thence along Fifth to Market, along Market to Dupont, to Sutter, and thence along Sutter street to Market, and thence along Market to the city front. Third -- Commencing at the intersection of Sutter and Dupont, and thence along Sutter and Market to the city front. The privilege extends for fifty years and conveys the right to use cables with stationary engines or compressed air to move the cars.

    The franchise of the Geary-street road allows the use of steam motors over that portion of their route upon Point Lobos avenue and Central avenue and First avenue, and also upon First avenue from Point Loboa avenue to the Park. The company has also the permission to lay tracks upon the side of Point Lobos avenue between Central and First avenues.

    The original Geary-street franchise was granted to Charles Main, Reuben Morton, B. C. Bigelow, James McCord, William Eppelsheimer, C. F. Macdemot and Thomas R. Hayes, October 28, 1878, for twenty-five years. A supplemental franchise to permit the company to cross Kearny street to Market was subsequently granted.

    The original route is along Geary street from Kearny, west side, to Central avenue ; thence along Point Lobos avenue to First avenue ; thence along First avenue to the Park. The franchise is for twenty-five years.

    A subsequent order, passed November 24, 1879, grants to the North Beach and Mission Railroad Company, the Geary-street, Park and Ocean Railroad Company and the Central Railroad Company the right of way for fifty years from Turk street, along Market to the city front.

    As soon as practicable, Directors representing the purchasing interest will be elected in the Directories of the respective roads. This will not, however, delay the work of preliminary surveys and active construction.

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  • Powell Street Railroad (Daily Alta California, Friday, December 10, 1886)

    Powell Street Railroad

    From the Daily Alta California / Friday, December 10, 1886. Page 2.

    Powell Street Railroad.

    Articles of Incorporation were filed yesterday by the Powell street Railroad Company. The Company propose to build, maintain and operate single or double track cable roads in the city for about 15 miles. The first road will begin at the intersection of Powell and Jefferson streets, thence along Powell to the junction of Market street, about two miles. The second road will begin at tbe intersection of First avenue and Jackson street and run thence to the intersection of Market and East streets. In its course it will pass along the following streets: Jackson, Steiner, Washington, Battery, Sacramento, Front, East and Clay, about nine miles. The capital stock is $2,000,000 in $100 shares. The Directors are: W. J. Adams, Thomas Magee, H.H. Lynch, George H. Waggoner and : H. C. Holmse (Holmes? - JT), who have subscribed for $40,000 each.

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  • Ferries and Cliff House Incorporated (Daily Alta California, Friday, December 16, 1887)

    Ferries and Cliff House Incorporated

    From the Daily Alta California / Friday, December 16, 1887. Page 2.

    Ferries and Cliff House.

    Articles of incorporation of the Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company were filed yesterday with the County Clerk. The routes over which the company expect to build are as follows :

    First -- From the intersection of Powell and Market streets to the junction of Taylor and Jefferson streets.

    Second -- Commencing at the intersection of Bay and Taylor streets, along Bay to Powell, to Jefferson, to Taylor and back to the intersection of Bay street.

    Third -- From the city front on East street to the intersection of California and Central avenues.

    Fourth -- From the intersection of California and Central avenue to the intersection of Forty-eighth avenue and Point Lobos road.

    Fifth -- From the intersection of California and Seventh avenue connecting with the California-street line, alone the line of Seventh avenue to Golden Gate Park, thence, returning to California street.

    Sixth -- From the intersection of Clay and Kearney streets along Clay to Van Ness avenue, and continuing to Forty-eighth along Clay street.

    The estimated length of all the lines is twenty-five miles. The capital stock is $2,500,000 The directors are William J. Adams, John Bullard, William H. Martin, Thomas Magee and Henry H. Lynch.

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  • Powell Street Road Deeded to Ferries and Cliff House (Daily Alta California, Friday, January 6, 1888)

    Powell Street Road Deeded to Ferries and Cliff House

    From the Daily Alta California / Friday, January 6, 1888. Page 1.

    The Powell-Street Road.

    A deed was filed in the Recorder's office yesterday afternoon by the Powell-street Railway Company, in which they deed all their property, franchises and rights to the Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company, in trust for the payment of $700,000 worth of bonds issued by the company. The amount of consideration is $5. The Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company has also filed a deed of trust and mortgage to Thomas Brown and J. A. Jarboe, trustees of the bonds before mentioned, and to the Powell-street Railway Company, to secure the payment of the bonds.

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  • Ferries and Cliff House Real Estate Transactions (Daily Alta California, Friday, January 6, 1888)

    Ferries and Cliff House Real Estate Transactions

    From the Daily Alta California / Friday, January 6, 1888. Page 7.

    from REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS.

    Powell-street Railway Company to Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company, lot 137.6x137.6, on NW cor of Washington and Masun, and franchises, privileges and rolling stock, $5.

    MORTGAGES.

    Ferries and Cliff House Railway Co to John R Jarboe et al, trostees. franchise, rolling stock, etc. assumes the bonds of the Powell-st Railwuy Co to the amount ot $700,000.

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  • Ferries and Cliff House New Cable (Daily Alta California, Saturday, March 24, 1888)

    Ferries and Cliff House New Cable

    From the Daily Alta California / Saturday, March 24, 1888. Page 2.

    Another Cable.

    The cable of the second or North Beach and Market-street division of the Ferries and Cliff House Railway system, 19,000 feet long, was successfully, laid yesterday morning. The work was begun at 4 o'clock in the morning, and it was not until 10 o'clock that it was completed. No less than fourteen dips had to be made in laying the cables, viz : Two at California street, two at Sutter, two at Geary, two at Clay, two at Union, two at each turn-table, one at Washington and PowelL and one at Jackson and Mason. It is expected that trial cars will be run over the road to-day.

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  • Ferries and Cliff House Another New Cable (Daily Alta California, Monday, May 21, 1888)

    Ferries and Cliff House Another New Cable

    From the Daily Alta California / Monday, May 21, 1888. Page 1.

    Tbe New Cable.

    The new cable to take the place of the wornout rope on the Powell street branch of the Ferries and Cliff House Railway was hauled up to the engine-house by thirty-two horses Saturday. The new cable is made of softer wire than the first cable and it will probably stand the wear and tear of the curves better.

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  • Slot Brake (Sausalito News, Friday, December 7, 1888)

    Slot Brake

    From the Sausalito News / Friday, December 7, 1888. Page 3.

    from Brieflets

    The new safety slot brake on the Powell Street Railroad in San Francisco has proved a perfect success, and has been applied to all cars on the road. It has been found to effectually prevent a car getting away on the steepest grades. This is the only cable road in the city which has adopted this style of brake.

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    From the 20-May-1899 Kansas City Journal.
    Robert Gillham

    MR. GILLHAM DEAD.

    Kansas City Loses One of Its Best Friends.

    SUCCUMBS TO PNEUMONIA.

    His Death Occaisioned Very General Regret.

    Mr. Gillham Had Been Identified With Street Railways, the Pittsburg and Gulf and Parks of Kansas City -- He was a Public Spirited Citizen.

    Robert Gillham is dead.

    Mr. Gillham died at 5 o'clock last night at his residence, 2105 Independence boulevard, from a complication of pneumonia and appendicitis. He had been ill only six days.

    Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Undertaker Stine will have charge and interment will bo at Forest Hill, where Mr. Gillham owns a large lot and where his mother is buried.

    Last Saturday night he went home feeling chilly. Soon after arriving at home he had three hard chills in rapid succession. He was not alarmed, but thought he was merely bilious. By Wednesday, however, it was apparent that he was a very sick man. and Dr. G. C. Mosher was called in. He at once saw that his patient was suffering from a severe attack of pneumonia. His condition continued to grow worse and Dr. J. D. Griffith was sent for early yesterday morning. Both physicians, Mr. Gillham's wife and two daughters, his brother-in-law, Albert Marty, and Judge C. E. Moss were at the bedside of the sick man all day yesterday. He was conscious until within a few hours .of the end, when he gradually sank into a stupor that terminated In a quiet, sleepllke death.

    Mr. Gillham, besides being general manager of the Pittsburg and Gulf railroad, had just returned from a laborious trip of ten days over the road with the receivers.

    The trip had taxed his strength considerably and he had caught cold. His associates believe, also, that the tremendous mental strain that he had been under Tor several months in the management of the Pittsburg and Gulf system, in its straits, had told upon his health and weakened him so that he was an easy prey to pneumonia. He had worried a great deal over the affairs of the railroad, and it was plainly running in his mind when he became unconscious. One of the last things he was heard to say was an almost inaudible muttering about the Belt line, a part of the Pittsburg and Gulf system, and 'then he added distinctly:

    "Life is too short to bother with all those details."

    In the afternoon Mr. Gillham was clearly himself, and he discussed with his physicians the advisability of using the oxygen treatment. He spoke of its success in Kipling's case, and said he thought it was a good thing. Later he complained frequently of the difficulty in breathing, and a few minutes before he lost consciousness he looked up at his old business associate, Judge C. E. Moss, and said:

    "I'm having a pretty hard time."

    "Yes," said Judge Moss, "but you've been worse off than you are now."

    Death Was Very Sudden.

    Since Saturday Mr. Gillham had taken no nourishment except a little whisky. The oxygen treatment had been used constantly. His death came so suddenly that few knew that he was even ill. At 9 o'clock Rev. Dr. Henry Hopkins, pastor of the church of which Mr. Gillham was a member, called at the residence. He was met by someone at the front steps who informed him that Mr. Gillham was dead. Dr. Hopkins went in and extended consolation and sympathy to Mrs. Gillham, who is prostrated with grief.

    O. H. Dean, J. McD. Trimble and other intimate friends and associates of Mr. Gillham, learning by telephone of his death, came in later.

    Sketch of His Life.

    Robert Gillham was the builder of Kansas City's street railway system. He engineered the street railway systems of all the other large cities of the West. He was not only a skillful engineer, but a promoter and organizer of rare ability. Of late years the Pittsburg and Gulf railroad had occupied the greater part of his attention, but he was interested in nearly every important public enterprite In Kansas City. As a member of the city park board he helped to plan the magnificent system of parks and boulevards of which the city is just coming into possession.

    In the language ot one of his oldtime friends last night, he had done more towards making Kansas City what it is than any other man.

    Robert Gillham was born in New York September 25, 1854. He was the third of four sons of John and Clarissa Gillham. His first education was in a private school at Lodi, N. J. When he was IB years old he entered a college at Hackensack. N. J., and studied engineering until 1874. In that year, at the age of 20, he established an office at Hackensack as an engineer. His first work was so thorough and displayed so much ability that he soon had all the sewerage, bridges and other engineering contract work that he could attend to in Hackensack. and was beginning to do work in New York city.

    It was in October, 1875, that he came to Kansas City. It was then a small town almost inaccessible. The city was reached by a ride up Bluff street to Fifth street in a rickety, slow, painful mule car.

    Uptown there was a dilapidated horsecar line to Westport, and the present extensive systems then readied no farther than Forest avenue on the East, Twelfth street on the south, and Fifth street on the north.

    Mr. Gillham at once took hold of Kansas City's street railway problem. He planned the Independence avenue and East Ninth street lines and built them. Then he built the Elevated road to Kansas City, Kas. And all these enterprises were pushed through by him in the teeth of the fiercest opposition. Ninth street had to be widened and other obstacles were thrown in the way of a franchise, by the city council, but Mr. Gillham finally overcame all theso difficulties and carried out the plans that he foresaw would succeed.

    Mr. Gillham went to work at a salary of $6,000 a year for the Kansas City Cable Railway Company, as it was then called. Soon he was given $10,000 a year, and in a few months Denver and Omaha had employed him to engineer their street rail way systems. He received $10,000 a year from each of these and was soon making from $40,000 to $5O,OOO a year in salaries -- the highest salaried man that Kansas City ever had.

    On December 1. 1881, Mr. Gillham was married to Miss Minnie Marty, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Matthias Marty, a prominent and wealthy family of Kansas City. There are three children, Elsie and Edith, 17 and 15 years old and a little son 3 years old. The Gillham residence at 2106 Independence boulevard, the property of Secretary Alger, is one of the handsomest on the East side. His father, a man of over 70, lives at 1301 Belleview. With him lives Robert Gillham's granmother, 94 years of age. Mr. Gillham's mother died last December at the age of 69.

    Mr. Glllham had always enjoyed good health, though not a strong man physically. Sixteen years ago he met with an accicdent that nearly cost him his life. It was, in fact, a marvel that he recovered. No one thought he could live, and the case was reported in medical journals as being a very unheard of one.

    He had invented a new street car grip. He got under the cable trenches at the power house to see how one of the new grips worked. While he was watching it the gripman accidentally let the grip fall. It fell upon Mr. Gillham's head, fracturing it in two places, the entire length of the skull. The fractures were bridged over with metallic appliances and after a year's time, in which Mr. Gillham ahstained from any active employment, he had recovered sulficiently to resume his work again.

    It was to this accident that Judge Moss referred when he told Mr. Gillham he had been in a worse condition than he was in yesterday afternoon.

    Eastern Roads Wanted Him.

    Little had been known of it except among his most intimate business associates, but Mr. Gillham would soon have been connected with one of the 'great Eastern railroad systems had he continued to live.

    "They had recognized his ability," said Judge Moss. last night, "and negotiations were pending to secure him. Had he lived there is no doubt that he would not have been in Kansas City very much longer. Although it was not publicly known, magnates of the Eastern roads were trying hard to get him.

    "He had the quickest mind I ever saw," continued Judge Moss. "He could comprehend most any kind of proposition, at a glance. He was a wonderful mathematician, his reputation in this respect being not second even to that of Superintendent Greedwood. of the public schools."

    Judge Moss' voice trembled and tears came into his eyes as he spoke ot the many other sides of Mr. Gillham's character.

    "He was always so kind and pleasant, and when business looked discouraging to me he could always figure a way out and cheer me up," he said.

    Judge Moss and Mr. Gillham were for years the owners of the Armourdale foundry, one of the largest foundries of the West. Both men made a great deal of money out of it. Judge Moss finally selling out to Mr. Gillham for $130,000. At his death Mr. Gillham owned the foundry, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Gus P. Marty.

    A Street Railway Constructor.

    Among the interesting stories told of Mr. Gillham by Judge Moss is one concerning the first cable railway project In Kansas City. Mr. Gillham's first idea was to bring the passengers from the Union Depot up the hill to Main street only. The complete system of cable railway was not planned until later. He decided that $300,000 would be sufficient to do it, and at once set work "boring" his friends to take $1,000 worth of stock apiece in it. It was slow, hard work. Cable Railways were in their infancy then, and even Mr. Gillham's best friends looked upon his scheme as impracticable. But Mr. Gillham would not allow himself to be discouraged. He kept trying to raise the money. W. J. Smith, who was then at the head of the mule car system in Kansas City, started on an Eastern trip from the Union depot one day. He happened to sit down beside Philip Chase, of Lynn, Mass.. who was a passenger in the same car. Mr. Smith called the attention of Mr. Chase to the steep bluff and said: "There's a young engineer, a friend of mine. In Kansas City, that says he can run cars up that hill by machinery, and that $300,000 will do it."

    Mr. Chase, who was a wealthy capitalist, began to ask questions about Gillham and his plan. Both men became more and more interested and although they were bound for New York city they turned back at Chicago, came to Kansas City, consulted with Gillham and at once put up $130,000 apiece. The result was the Ninth street incline and a cable road to Woodland avenue. The stock soon went soaring upward and Mr. Gillham sold $8,000 worth of it, his share, for $20,000. This was the first bit of money that he made. After that it came fast and easily.

    At the time Mr. Gillham built the Grandview line and Elevated road, he was worth fully $250,000. He had then been in Kansas City barely ten years and had come here a poor young man. Many thousands of dollars were invested by Mr. Gillham In Grandview property. He had great faith in the future of property there and still held it at his death, but values had depreciated to such an extent that he was not estimated by friends who were asked concerning it last night to be worth so much as $230,000. His salary as general manager ot the Pittsburg & Gulf railroad was $15,000 for the main line and extra amounts for the branches, perhaps $20,000 or $25,000 a year in all. His income from the foundry and from the Elevated road and other enterprises In which he was a large stockholder was considerable.

    Besides the Kansas City cable lines, Mr. Gillham planned and constructed in 1888 the West End street railway, of Boston, with its seven power houses; eleven miles of double track in Denver, the Omaha system, and lines in Cleveland, Fort Worth, Providence, Brooklyn, Nashville, St. Joseph and Scranton, Pa. He was consulting engineer in the Chicago elevated road building. It was while these vast street railway enterprises were occupying every minute of his attention, and salaries aggregating $30,000 were being paid to him, that Judge Moss Importuned him to help him with the Armourdale foundry. This foundry was furnishing Kansas City with all its Iron work, was making money fast and was giving Judge Moss more than he could attend to. Mr. Gillham said to him: "I'm making too much at this to quit it now. You go ahead with the foundry and just take out whatever salary suits you. I'll be with you after awhile." "And so the foundry ran on for several years." said Judge Moss. "Gillham owned the biggest part of it, but he let me go ahead and pay myself as I saw fit."

    Construction of the Tunnel.

    In addition to the Ninth street incline, one of the greatest engineering feats accomplished by Mr. Gillham was the construction of the Eighth street tunnel. This was declared by many engineers to be utterly impracticable, but within eleven months after ground was broken for it, in 1887, cars were running beneath the high hluffs to the Union depot and across the Kaw into Kansas. Mr. Gillham was a prominent contributor to the leading engineenng and scientinc periodicals of England and America. He received a considerable income from the articles he snatched the time to write, and was much interested in the discussion of scientific subjects. He was on board tho steamer City of Paris three years ago when her piston rods broke In mid-ocean, and everybody expected the ship to go down. Mr. Glllham was the only engineer on board who exactly understood what the trouble was, and it was to his direction that the salvation of the steamship was attributed. When he reached Paris he wrote, by request, an explanation of the break in the machinery, its causes, etc., which was published on both sides of the ocean.

    As a Railroad Man.

    With the passing of Mr. Gillham, one of the most unique figures in the railroad world is removed. He was In many ways a remarkable man and possesed a tenacity of purpose that was the fondatlon of his success. It was as a civil engineer that his remarkable proficiency brought him into prominent notice. He is brought into consultation regarding some exceedingly difficult engineering feat to be accomplished in the building of the "Pee Gee." His ideas were lucid and practicable and soon afterward he was appointed general manager of the road. He was absolute in the operation of the line and he brought to bear many features that were new to tho railroad world.

    In the operation of the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf railroad he kept in touch with all the details and was quick to perceive a weak point and correct it before it had been allowed to interfere with the earning power of the road, and the consequence is that he had the affairs of the railroad within reach all the time and established a system that would enable him to tell the condition of the road at any time.

    Tho most remarkable thing about his work and connection with the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf railroad was in the conception and final completion of the Port Arthur canal, and when the waters of the Gulf flowed to tho wharf at Port Arthur, there was no man in the country who felt the relief at tho accomplishment of the great work is did Mr. Gillham.

    As an executive officer he was called into consultation in all matters pertaining in the affairs of the company, and in the days preceding the appointment of receivers he made several trips East to consult with the financiers of the East. The confidence which he enjoyed was never better exemplified than on the day when the petition for the appointment of receivers was presented to Judge Thayer in the United States circuit court. On that day all parties combined In asking Judge Thayer to reappoint Mr. Gillham as receiver of the road. There are $23,000,000 of bonds of the company, and it is estimated that over $20,000,000 was represented in court on that day. The court instructed the receivers to retain him as general manager, a compliment seldom paid to the ability of the head of the operating department of a railroad.

    The success of the Port Arthur route is In a great measure largely due to the untiring energy of Mr. Gillham.

    Judge McD. Trimble, who as senior counsel, a director and receiver of the Pittsburg and Gulf railway was associated for so many years with Mr. Gillham. said last night: "Mr. Gillham was one of the brightest and most industrious of men. His capacity for work was unlimited, and during recent years he has performed more work than six men should have done. I am inclined to attribute his sudden death to his nervous condition resulting from overwork. He vas full of zeal and energy and managed his affairs with more than the usual amount of skill. His death is a great loss to the community and to his profession.

    "The effect of Mr. Gillham's death will he seriously felt on the road of which he was general manager," continued Judge Trimble. "His place will be difficult to fill as he knew every detail of his business. He has done much for the road, possibly more than any other one man. His whole heart was with the railroad, and he gave it his entire time and attention.

    "It is yet too early to speak of his successor, but it will probably be necessary for Colonel Fordyce, one of the receivers, to manage the operating department before a new general manager is named. I do not think that Mr. Gillham's successor will be an Eastern man. I am inclined to believe that a Kansas City man will be appointed. However. Colonel Fordyce may favor a St. Louis man."

    As a Park Enthusiast.

    Mr. Gillham was an ardent friend and promoter of Kansas City's park and boulevard system, which he helped to plan. He was foremost in all movetnents which had for their object the beautificatlon of the city. He threw himself with all his energy into the work and though almost, if not quite, as busy a man as President Meyer himself he found time to do an immense amount of work in performing his duties as member of the park board, to which he was appointed In 1895.

    "Mr.Glllham was my personal friend," said President Meyer, of the park board, "and I feel his death as a severe personal loss. But it is Kansas City that loses more than I. Mr. Gillham was one of the best friends Kansas City ever had, and he has done as much toward its growth and progress as any man. He had an immense energy and he devoted it to the work in hand. The park work lay very close to his heart and he gave freely of his time and energy for the city's good. Mr. Gillham was an ideal citizen, and it will be hard to replace such a man. In many respects it cannot be done.

    D. J. Haff, attorney for the park board said that with the possible exception of Colonel Kersey Coates, the death of Mr. Gillham was the greatest loss Kansas City had ever sustained.

    "He had been driving sixteen horses abreast for years," said Mr. Haft. "He gave freely of his vitality and there is no doubt that he undermined his strength, at least in part, by the assiduity of his devotion to his duty."

    Mr. Gillham's services were appreciated and he was serving his third term as a member of the park board, having been appointed originally In 1895 by Mayor Davis, reappointed in 1897 by Mayor Jones and reappointed for a third term last April by Mayor Jones.

    Mr. Gillham's death Is the third change in the park board within the past few months. Charles Campbell resigned and was succeeded by J. K. Burnham: Simeon B. Armour died and was succeeded by Wllliam Barton. Mr. Gillham's is the second death In the park board within two months.

    A Devout Christian.

    Dr. Henry Hopkins, of the First Congregational church, of which Mr. Gillham was a devout member, was deeply affected at his death.

    "I married Mr. Glllham. December 1, 1881," he said, "to Miss Minnie Marty,

    "I found Mr. Gillham, when I came here, one of the stanchest (sic - JT) members of the church." he said, "and he soon became to me the warmest-hearted of friends. As a friend and a church member I came to cherish him more and regard him more highly up to the day of his death."

    Tributes of Friends.

    Mr. Gillham was a man who made friends and kept them. He was probably acquainted with more people than any man in Kansas City. His death was a general topic of regretful discussion throughout the city last night.

    Mayor Jones was astounded when he learned of the death of Mr. Gillham.

    "It will be impossible for this city to have another citizen who was so deeply interested in the welfare ot the public and who will do more for the good of all," said the mayor. "The citizens of Kansas City will always remember Mr. Gillham particularly for his efficient service on the park board and the great improvements that are now being made will be monuments to the skill and energy of the man who was one of the best citizens that this city has ever known. He was an intimate friend of mine. The loss to the community will be a great one."

    J. K. Burnham remained with the bereaved family until a late hour.

    "The people of Kansas City cannot realize their loss." said Mr. Burnham. "Mr. Gillham's death will be felt in business and social circles alike. His generosity and popularity were his prominent traits."

    Walton H. Holmes, who knew Mr. Glllham most intimately through their association during the growth of the street railway system In this city, said: "Mr." Gillham was a pioneer cable road builder. The result of his hard labor will ever be present.

    "We owe the construction of many of our most important lines to him. I knew Mr. Glllham most intimately and admired his many excellent traits of character. The street railway business missed him when he assumed the position of general manager of the Pittsburg and Gulf, and he will be missed much more now."

    Mr. Glllham was a level headed businessman and a prominent member of the Commercial Club. Ex-President William Barton said last night: "I regretted to hear of the death of Mr. Gillham just as I was leaving tho theater. He was highly esteemed by all and was an earnest worker. His death is a great loss to our city, not only in business circles will this be felt, but also on the park board. I was just beginning to feel that I knew him well, since our association together on the park board. I was particularly impressed with his courtesy and consideration."

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    Personal Reminiscences of Early Cable Street Railway Work in Kansas City, MO by EJ Lawless

    From the October 15, 1900 Street Railway Journal, page 582.

    PERSONAL REMINISCENCES OF EARLY CABLE STREET RAILWAY WORK IN KANSAS CITY, MO.

    BY E. J. LAWLESS.

    EJ Lawless

    The work of construction on the Kansas City Cable Ry. was completed in the spring of 1885, at which time the writer was engaged to come from San Francisco and take charge of its operation. This was the fourth city in the United States to operate street railways by cable propulsion and one of the first cities to depart from the regular practice in vogue in San Francisco, the cradle bed of cable roads, the result being novel, startling, but hardly surprising to an experienced man, with the final culmination of being obliged to change to San Francisco methods which should not have been departed from in the first instance.

    The grades in Kansas City are numerous and as a whole very steep, one in particular running from the "Bluffs" to the "Bottoms" called the "Incline" (mostly trestle work) having a rise of 18 1/2 ft. per 100 ft.

    The cars were closed, single truck, vestibuled ends, having the grip hung between the axles, and operated by a wheel attached to a staff with hardly sufficient power to pull a baby carriage, to say nothing of hauling a car load of passengers. To overcome this obstacle a worm gear was attached to the grip staff which helped to further demonstrate the inefficiency of the grip. I shall never forget the first trip made over the road. The schedule time for the journey was 45 minutes, but we made it that day in about four hours. How the car ever managed to climb the Incline is still a mystery, but the writer can yet hear the echo of the sigh of relief from the occupants, when the top of the hill was reached.

    peculiar incident occurred in laying the track on this road, and who was responsible for the error could never be found out, but the rails were laid about an inch too far apart, with the result that the car wheels had a bad habit of dropping off the track on one side, which usually resulted in an argument between persons on either side of the car, one insisting that the wheels were off the rail, while the person on the opposite side thought the other either blind or a fool. It came about this way: The maker of the gage (sic -- JT) allowed for the play of the wheels. The contractor did the same. The track layer followed suit and the truck maker adopting the regular practice at the time of allowing this play, the results were as stated. Of course the rails had to be relaid to gage.

    The double cable system was adopted, but with a city like Kansas City, having heavy grades and numerous curves, the cables were always interfering, so much so that when the reserve cable was wanted it was found to be in sections and absolutely useless. Another serious obstacle was the difficulty of getting trained gripmen. We got a few from Chicago, but as they were not experienced in operating cars on grades, they were not much better than green men.

    Having fully demonstrated the utter impracticability of the original grip adopted; through the kindness of Mr. C. B. Holmes, then superintendent of the Chicago City Railway Co., a grip similar to that in use in San Francisco was borrowed. This grip demonstrated its superiority over the other by pulling the platform off the first trailer when hauling six cars up a heavy grade.

    After three months of the hardest kind of work to perfect the system, a grand opening was given the public, with the privilege of riding free the first day. A grip car with two trailers containing the officials of the road and many prominent citizens led the van. Everything went well until we came to the head of the Incline. Here a stop was made preparatory to starting over the bluff. To many on the cars, that grade looked like a plunge down a cliff. When starting from the level down the steep grade the cars naturally give a heavy lurch. That was enough that day. In less time than it takes to tell, only two were left on the train, one the gripman, the other the brakeman. It was on that occasion that a prominent citizen made his famous leap, the record for which has never been equalled in that district.

    It would take too much time and space to relate the troubles and tribulations of the first few months of operation. As the men got experienced the system ran smoother, with the ultimate result that the financial success of the enterprise was so pronounced (net earnings 30 per cent for the first year), a regular epidemic of cable roads started throughout the city. I wish to state here that too much credit cannot be given to Mr. W. J. Smith, then president of the Kansas City Cable Railway Co., for his pluck in putting his hand down in his pocket and furnishing the money (about $100,000) to make the changes necessary to success, in the face of adverse conditions and when financial aid was refused elsewhere.

    The next cable move in Kansas City was the purchase of the Corrigan horse car system by a Boston syndicate, and a conversion of those lines to cable. No doubt many have still vivid recollections of their early experiences with the Corrigan horse cars, 10-ft. bobtails, with mules inured to all kinds of service. The tracks (what there were of them) were single with turnouts. These turnouts were, however, superfluous, as when the cars met, one simply turned towards the gutter and traveled along until it struck the track again. This, however, did not trouble the public any, as it was difficult to tell if the cars were on the tracks or not. The first step the Boston syndicate took was to have these cars washed, and it is said the price of soap in Kansas City advanced for the time being in consequence. During the conversion of the Corrigan system the Grand Ave. and Westport lines were also changed to cable, and this was followed by the construction of the 10th St. cable road, which paralleled the lines of the Kansas City Cable Railway Co., and proved immediately on its completion and operation that cable roads in Kansas City had been overdone. In a period covering little more than two years, about eight millions of dollars had been invested in the various systems throughout the city.

    The cable craze ended in a grand flourish with the construction of a cable road in the northeast part of the city, under the Terry patents. This was to prove a revelation in economy of construction, and it did so, with a vengeance, as few working on its construction or furnishing material got any money; about $50,000 actual cash paid represented an expenditure of $250,000. The grip was constructed to occupy little space in the conduit and the cable was grasped by a series of perpendicular steel rollers placed loosely in the jaws which were tapered at each end.

    After numerous delays and tribulations a start was effected, and only one trip made over the road. Such an experience has rarely if ever been equalled. The rollers in the grip jaws made a noise like a threshing machine, and when they did succeed in gripping the cable, the car shot forward with a jerk sufficient to throw you off your feet. In fact the entire trip was a series of jerks and jumps, the rollers slipping from one end of the jaws to the other. On the completion of that trial trip every creditor made a rush for his money. Liens were filed and suits instituted to such an extent that for years that road stood as a monument to the folly of the enterprise.

    Too much tribute cannot be paid to the citizens of Kansas City for the hearty co-operation accorded the success of the roads. They quickly recognized what an important factor the cable system was in the development of their city, and did everything in their power to foster and encourage it. There is no portion of his life on which the writer looks back with greater pleasure than on his street railway experience in Kansas City.

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    Trial Voyage of Ferry Marin/1

    From the San Francisco Chronicle / Tuesday, May 7, 1912. Page 20.

    The article calls the ferry "Marin City", but her owners called her "Marin". The steamer Requa burned and Marin was rebuilt on her hull with an internal combustion engine.

    NEW FERRY-BOAT WILL MAKE TRIAL TRIP TODAY

    Northwestern Pacific's Marin City Ready for Service

    The Northwestern Pacific's new ferryboat, Marin City, built to take the place of the "Requa" which was destroyed by fire several months ago, will make a trial trip from Sausalito this afternoon and if everything works smoothly will be placed on the Sausalito, Tiburon, Belvedere run at once. It is a sister ship of the Requa, as far as construction is concerned, and will take the place of the James M Donohue, the vessel put on after the loss of the Requa, and against which Tiburon and Belvedere residents recently complained to the state Railroad Commission. Contrary to reports, the Northwestern Pacific is not going to renew direct ferry service between San Francisco and Belvedere and Tiburon. It will retain the present routing between those points and Sausalito unless compelled to change by the Commission. Tiburon and Belvedere residents expressed their grievances against the railroad company, it was alleged, were accentuated when they were forced frequently to stand for many minutes at the train at the Sausalito transfer point.

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    Trial Voyage of Ferry Marin/2

    From the San Francisco Chronicle / Wednesday, May 8, 1912. Page 20.

    The article calls the ferry "Marin City", but her owners called her "Marin". The steamer Requa burned and Marin was rebuilt on her hull with an internal combustion engine. I think California City was part of Point Richmond, but I could be wrong.

    NEW FERRY STEAMER ON SUCCESSFUL TRIAL RUN

    The Marin City goes on Sausalito-Tiburon run tomorrow

    The Northwestern Pacific's ferry steamer Requa, partially destroyed by fire several months ago and now rebuilt, improved and named the Marin City, was given a trial trip at Sausalito yesterday by officials of the company. The vessel left Sausalito, made the run from Tiburon to Angel Island, thence through the Raccoon Straits to California City and back to Sausalito in unusually quick time. So successful was this trip that the Marin City will be placed in the Sausalito-Tiburon-Belvedere run tomorrow.

    The Marin City, ninety-eight by fifteen feet in dimensions, has been equipped with all modern conveniences according to officials of the company, and its speed demonstrated satisfactorily yesterday. It will hold 200 people comfortably and has a 150 horsepower engine. It is a touch more comfortable than the James M Donohue, the present steamer on the Sausalito run, against which the Tiburon and Belvedere residents have been complaining for some time.

    Among other guests on the trial trip yesterday General Manager W. F. Palmer and Superintendent W. J. Hunter of the Northwestern Pacific had, as a guest, Captain Fisher of the steamer Korea.

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    Chicago People Want Their Money Back

    From the The Saint Paul Daily Globe / Friday, August 03, 1888. Page 8.

    The North Chicago Street Railroad was built cheaply.

    CHICAGO'S CABLE CARS.

    An Angry Mob Tired of Having the Machinery Break Threatens Violence.

    Chicago, Aug. 2. -- A mob invaded the general offices of the North Side cable road last night, demanding the return of fares, and threatening to assault the president of the road, Charles T. Yerkes, late of Philadelphia, and familiarly known here as Baron Yerkes. The demonstration occurred when for the second time within twenty-four hours the new cable collapsed through ill-working machinery, and the cars on the entire system stopped. They were crowded with thousands homeward bound. The nickels had been paid, and, as the people were tired, many patiently waited for an hour. As the cable continued motionless they then disembarked and poured down the sidewalks. The cabmen who have recently been reaping a harvest on the north side, galloped their horses along the tracks merrily, calling out: "Have a cab, sir." Vehicles were quickly filled. Tab is kept on the cable by many hackmen, and as soon as a break is announced they rush along the line looking for patronage.

    The passengers on the long train that happened to be halted at the corner of Division and Clark streets, at the headquarters of the company, gave vent to their feelings in wholesale profanity. A fine looking, well-dressed old gentleman declared he would stand "the slow robbery" no longer, and proposed to get what he paid for or his money. He started for the cashier's office and was followed instantly by fifty equally angry and determined passengers. Cashier Swartz nervously replied to the loud demands that he had "only authority to take in money." The awkward reply infuriated the crowd, and yells for "Yerkes" went up from dozens of throats. By this time the office and street was filled with hundreds of excited citizens. Fortunately for the officials of the road they had left, but the secretary and superintendent of the construction com pany were in their office. They heard the commotion down stairs, though, and knew what was coming, for they barred the door and lost no time in making their escape by the rear stairway with as much dignity as circumstances would allow. While the attention of the crowd was diverted, the cashier grabbed up the money box and escaped. The mob lingered for an hour, but finally dispersed without carrying out their threats to wreck the company's office.

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  • Chicago -- Halsted Street Runaway (Saint Paul Daily Globe, Monday, February 25, 1895)

    Chicago -- Halsted Street Runaway

    From the Saint Paul Daily Globe / Monday, February 25, 1895. Page 1.

    The Halsted line belonged to the West Chicago Street Railroad.

    THRILLING CHICAGO ESCAPE.

    Train Runs Into a Horse Car -- Chicago Cable Car Accident.

    WOMEN BADLY BRUISED.

    Chicago Gripman Unable to Release His Grip.

    CHICAGO, Feb. 24. -- A collision on the Halsted street cable line this afternoon caused a great deal of excitement, and resulted in three women being badly bruised, although at first it was thought a number of persons had been seriously injured. The accident was caused by the gripman being unable to release his grip from the cable, on account of a broken strand becoming entagled in the grip, and the train crashed into one ahead. Many passengers escaped by jumping, while a number were thrown to the floor of the cars by. the collision. Those injured are: Mrs. Ellen Cronin, Miss Margaret Cronin and Miss Ida Martin.

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    Chicago Tunnels Need to be Lowered

    From the New-York Tribune / Wednesday, January 08, 1902. Page 9.

    The North Chicago Street Railroad was not known as a good corporate citizen.

    from THE PASSING THRONG.

    A. C. Garsia, at the Imeprial yesterday, said: "There is a good illustration of a too common situation in American municipal government offered by Chicago just now. The Chicago River is to be widened and deepened, a step made imperative by the growing trade of the port, for Chicago is a port as much or even more than Liverpool, for instance. Under the river are three tunnels, used now by the North Chicago cable car lines to bring their cars and traffic down into the heart of the city. The tops of these tunnels are now so near the surface that deep draught vessels sometimes stick in them. To deepen the channel these tunnels must be lowered, at a cost of some $250,000. An order is now pending before the Chicago Common Council to compel the traction company to have this lowering done. The company does not want to go to that expense, nor the trouble of transferring passengers over bridges while the work is being done. They are fighting the order by the usual methods. It is a case of private interest set against the growing needs of trade and the public welfare. Of course, the public must win in time."

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    Anti-Yerkes Sentiment

    From the Saint Paul Daily Globe / Sunday, August 05, 1888. Page 4.

    Robber baron Charles T. Yerkes owned the North Chicago Street Railroad and the West Chicago Street Railroad.

    from SUNDAY SALAD.

    Chicago is in the midst of a cable car row. The complaint against Mr. Yerkes, the owner of the Chicago cable car line, is that he refuses to give transfer tickets from one line to another, and that when his cable ropes break he charges passengers full fare, although they have to get out and walk to the end of the line. The Chicago populace are always opposed to extortion unless it is done by a Chicago man. Yerkes is a Philadelphian.

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    x

    From the San Francisco Call / xday, October 11, 1895. Page 5.

    x.

    x.

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    x

    From the San Francisco Call / xday, October 11, 1895. Page 5.

    x.

    x.

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    Billiards Player Recovers

    From the San Francisco Call / Friday, October 11, 1895. Page 5.

    SCHAEFFER HAS RECOVERED.

    And So Some Great Billiard Playing Is Expected.

    NEW YORK, N. Y., Oct. 10. -- Billiard lovers will delighted to hear of Jacob Schaeffer's entire recovery of the use of his right wrist, which was fractured some months ago, when he was thrown from a Chicago cable-car. A couple of years ago "The Wizard" broke the same wrist by falling downstairs in the dark. He was laid up a long time before be regained the use of his arm. The more recent injury threatened at one time to disable him for life as a skilled player of billiards.

    Skilled surgery has again triumphed and saved him from sad disaster, Schaeffer bas been playing in something of his old dashing form at his Chicago billiard-hall, and is again anxious to jump into the professional arena and play for the public instruction and entertainment. This is a good thing for billiards and the public too. There is a chance that he may be seen in tournaments soon with the other stars.

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    Sadie Williams and Her Hatpin

    From the Shiner Gazette (Shiner, Texas) / Wednesday, January 12, 1898. Page 5.

    A Chicago Heroine

    There is one Chicago woman who deserves a medal and a monument for heroine courage and brilliant achievement. Her name is Sadie Williams and the story of her exploit is told in the telegraphlc news columns

    Miss Williams was one of four passengers in a Chicago cable car which was attacked by two robbers who were having a fierce encounter with the conductor who determinedly stood his ground.

    Two passengers having the outward semblance of men and the gripman saw the conductor struggling with the robbers without making an effort to aid him though with their help there would have been four to two instead of one to two. Miss Williams, small of figure but with a courage which made up for lack of physical force, saw that the conductor was being worsted and gallantly went to his rescue. Taking the long hat pin from her hair she began to ply it vigorously until she had sent one robber screaming with pain from the car. Then she turned her attention to the other, jabbing him in the face and in the solar plexus with her hat pin until he was glad to join his companion in flight and leave the plucky young woman in undisputed possession of the field.

    Then Miss Williams calmly surveyed the situation There were but two persons left on the car, the conductor bleeding and half unconscious on the floor and herself. She bent over him and asked if he was hurt and finding that he was not and that there was nothing more to be done she promptly fainted just like a woman. She was equal to the emergency while it lasted but collapsed as soon as it was till over.

    There have been numerous instances of train holdups and street car robberies vhen just such craven fear as was exhibited by the gripman and the two male passengers in the Chicago incident permitted two or three men to intimidate and rob several times their number and when some courageous determined person among them might have saved all. Miss Williams deserves to be reckoned among the heroines of the hour. -- San Antonio Express

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    Actress Hurt by Cable Car

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / x, February 10, 1889. Page 11.

    ?

    Clara Lane, the rather pretty girl who sang at the Park Theater in "The Pearl of Pekin," and afterward in "Mynheer Jan," was run over and hurt by a San Francisco cable car recently.

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    xr

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Saturday, August 29, 1885. Page 2.

    Excerpt from Current Events

    The new cable railroad to Manhattanville will be opened to the public on Monday next. A crowd of politicians and a brass band will make the trial trip interesting this afternoon.

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    xr

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Monday, August 31, 1885. Page 4.

    A FAILURE.

    Second Trial on the New York Cable Road.

    The Grip Improperly Adjusted -- A Slow Trip Over the Route -- Colonel Paine Hopeful.

    After eighteen months of elaborate preparation the Third avenue Railroad Company, of New York, announced that its cable road would be in operation to-day from One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street and Third avenue to One Hundred and Eighty-seventh street and Tenth avenue in that city. A trial trip which was a failure was made on Saturday last, yet the management announced that everything would be made right and that the public could enjoy a cable road ride this morning.

    A reporter for the EAGLE was sent to view the workings of the new road this morning. At One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street and Eighth avenue he found that the track was in readiness for the cable, but that no preparations had been made for laying it. At the depot of the cable company, Tenth avenue and One Hundred and Twenty-eighth street, everything was in confustion, horses were hitched to come of the cable cars and were drawing them around the switches, while men were at work on others taking off and adjusting grips. Mr. J. H. Robinson, the superintendent, was everywhere trying his best to learn exactly why it was that the system did not work. Colonel Paine, of the bridge, was there expressing the hope that in a few days everything would be made straignt and the road would be in successful operation. Mr D. J. Miller, the chief engineer of the road, was at home sick and ??? One of the many stockholders of the Third avenue line, who made the trip which took over three hours on Saturday, was present.

    At half past nine o'clock two cars were pulled out of the station and got in readiness to open the road to the public. About fifty men and small boys crowded into the cars and by yells and cat calls indicated their willingness to make the trip. The man in charge of the grip pulled the levers of his machine, but the cars refused to start. After a time, however, they started with the assistance of some of the passengers. Just above the depot and beginning at One Hundred and Twenty-ninth street is a hill about nine blocks long, the incline of which is very steep. After half a dozen ??? The cars mounted this hill and proceeded on their journey to One Hundred and Eighty-seventh street and return. The whole distance traversed is less than seven miles and nearly two hours were consumed in the journey. Upon the return of the cars it was found that the grip was defective. The weight of the passengers pressed down the springs. Men were put to work to remedy the defect and it is said that the road will be successfully operated in a day or so.

    The grip in use on this line is similar to that used in Chicago and San Francisco. The cable runs along the center of the track in a tunnel eighteen inches wide and twenty six inches deep, and is caught by the grip on the side. The cable is now raised, as on the bridge, when in use. It is operated by a two Wright engines of 350 horse power each.

    The arrangements of the road are nearly perfect. In the main depot are duplicate cable machines, so that when the cable gets out of order the second one can be used immediately. It is the intention to run the line from river to river and to have connections with al the routes from the city proper. Colonel Paine, who is greatly interested in the working of the cable system, said:

    "These failures are only caused by the lack of proper preparations. When the grips are satisfactorily adjusted the road will be a decided succcess, and will demonstrte the practicability of the cable as a means of transit. I believe that before the end of the week the road will be running very satisfactorily."

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    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / x, November 12, 1885. Page 2.

    Excerpt from Current Events

    President Lyon, of the Third avenue Railroad, New York, in his annual report to the directorys yesterday intimated that the cable system would soon supersede the use of horses on all the routes of the company.

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    Cal Cable To Reopen

    From the San Francisco Chronicle / Wednesday, August 8, 1906. Page 8.

    CABLE LINE TO OPEN NEXT WEEK

    Car Service on California Street to Be Resumed Shortly.

    The California street line will operate on Thursday of next week. Superintendent Harris has been busy since the fire in straightening things out, and a trial of the machinery made yesterday revealed the fact that everything is in good order. One shaft was sprung by the heat of the fire, but that will be repaired in a few days and the line will be ready for operation. The cable slot and tracks along California street are in good order, and as soon as the crossing at Polk and California streets is fixed cars will be ready to run. The switch at that place was being installed by the United Railroads, but the strike of the trackmen retarded the work, and it will be finished by the California street Cable Railway Company.

    Twenty new cars ordered by the company are beginning to arrive and these are in the barn at Hyde and California streets and will be ready to run in a few days. The first trial car will be sent over the route on Monday next and a few days will be required to attend to the details and get everything in order before service is restored permanently.

    The cars will start at the ferry and run out California street to Presidio avenue where transfers will be made to the United Railroads for the Cliff House.

    The machinery at the power-house at Hyde and California streets, although somewhat damaged by the fire is now in better order than ever. The triple engines have been turned over and all the weak points have been found and repaired. The slots in which the cables move have been smoothed out, and it is thought that the cars will run smoother than ever.

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    Cal Cable To Reopen Soon

    From the San Francisco Chronicle / Tuesday, August 14, 1906. Page 8.

    FEW REPAIRS FOR CALIFORNIA LINE

    Cable Cars to Operate This Week Over Uninjured Roadbeds.

    A trial trip over the California-street line yesterday demonstrated that the cable slot was in the best of condition, and had been injured by the fire to a slight extent only. One of the new cars was run over the entire line. The machinery in the power house at Hyde and California streets stood the strain easily, and literally jerked the cable car over the steep hills.

    The line will be in operation for passengers on Thursday morning unless the plans of Superintendent Harris miscarry. He is unwilling to resume operations unless he has a sufficient number of cars in service to supply all demands. At present there are only eight of the new cars in the barn and these are being painted up. Twenty have been ordered, but the remainder of the shipment has not yet arrived. At a pinch the line will operate with the eight cars already on the ground, but it is doubtful whether these can be put into shape by the appointed time.

    The line is in condition for traffic now, and the machinery is kept in motion. Two or three of the new cars will be sent over the line to-morrow, both to test the line again and to see that the cars themselves are in working order. The officials are unwilling to start it unless all the cars are ready and the schedule can be carried out without a hitch.

    Cars will start at the ferry and go out California street to Presidio avenue, where transfers will be made to the United Railroads.

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    Cal Cable Test

    From the San Francisco Chronicle / Thursday, August 16, 1906. Page 8.

    FIRST CAR RUN ON CALIFORNIA STREET

    Successful Test of the Cable Line Which Will Soon Be in Operation.

    For the first time since the fire a car was run over the California street cable line yesterday afternoon. Cheers greeted the car's appearance all along the line.

    The car started from the barn at California and Hyde streets promptly at 1 o'clock and ran out to the western terminus of the road. It then returned and crossed the hill to the other end of the road, at Drumm and California streets. The trip was made to test the road and the new cable, and proved in every respect satisfactory.

    Among the passengers on the car were: John B. Stetson, president of the road; Alfred Bowes, master mechanic; J. W. Harris, superintendent; George Hare, adjuster; A. McLean, chief engineer; John T. McGee, assistant superintendent; John C. Coleman, a director; Albert Simpson, assistant superintendent; Daniel Buckley, the builder, and Chief of Police Dinan.

    "The cars were built by J. Hammond & Co. and I think they deserve a great deal of credit for their quick work," said President Stetson. "They are the first cars to be built in San Francisco since the fire, and were constructed in less than ninety days. We will have four cars carrying passengers tomorrow, and we expect to have eight running by Saturday. Four of these will go out unpainted. We are to have twenty cars built.

    "We want to speak a word in appreciation of the conductors and gripmen, who set to work cleaning bricks or doing anything they could to help us get straightened out."

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    Brooklyn Heights -- Threading the Cable

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Saturday, July 11, 1891. Page 6.

    Note that the Brooklyn Heights line began by using a cable made up entirely of steel wires, rather than steel wires wrapped around a hemp core. The cable had to be welded rather than spliced.

    IN THE CONDUIT

    Final Preperations for the Montague Street Line.

    A Boy Crawling Through the Cable Pipe Like a Rat With the Guide Rope -- Cars to Run Every Two and a Half Minutes to Wall Street Ferry.

    Groups of interested people this morning surrounded a handsome new street car on Montague street bearning the inscription, "Brooklyn Heights Railroad Company, Wall Street Ferry and City Hall. No. 1."

    It was the first car of the new cable line from city hall to Wall street ferry, but its appearance did not mean that the line would be opened to-day. The car was being used to draw into place in the underground conduit the steel cable which will furnish motive power to the line, and the cars will not be running until some day next week. The preparation attracted much attention. The cable itself is 9,100 feet long, 1 1/8 inches in diameter, and is of solid twisted steel, instead of being wound around a manilla heart, as the bridge and Harlem cables are. It weighs 2 1/2 pounds the foot or something over eleven tons. Getting it into place was an ingenious operation and began yesterday afternoon. The work will occupy all told about twenty-four hours. The conduit in Montague street is connected with the power house of the company in State street, opposite Willow place, by a brick circular conduit running from the corner of Montague and Hicks streets through Hicks to State and down State to the power house where are engine and spool that will keep the cars in motion. The end of the cable was introduced at the power house and it was done in this way: the conduit through State and Hicks street is seventeen inches in diameter and is only connected with the street by a series of iron convers like those over manholes in a sewer. The covers open upon the pulleys which hold the cable up, like the cable pulleys upon the bridge. A boy started through the conduit from the power house dragging the end of a manilla rope. The boy crawled all the way from the power house to Hicks and Montague streets, dragging the rope behind him to the place in which the cable was to go. As the load became too heavy for the lad men would reach down the conduit holes behing shim, catch the rope and pull it from the power house, leaving the line behind the boy slack. Then the rope was spliced to the end of the cable and this was pulled through by a force of men.

    When Montague street was reached a different motive power could be used. A slot through the surface of the street connects with the conduit, through which the grip on the cable underneath connects with the brakes on the car. The end of the cable was made fast to this grip and the car was then drawn along the track by horses, stringing the cable underneath as it went. The course was from Hicks street thorugh Montague to the Court street end of the line on the up track; then to the Wall street ferry on the down track and back to Hicks street on the up. That work was done last night. This morning the agile boy was called into requisition again to draw the guide rope back through the conduit to the power station while men dragged the cable behind him. When that is done nothing will remain at the power station but to weld the two ends of the cable into one, making it an endless chain. That will probably be done Monday by a new process under the supervision of Allen Rodgers, the superintendent of the line brought from the West, where he has had much experience with cable roads in Denver and Cleveland. The grip underneath the cars is not the spool grip in use on the bridge, but an invention which Mr. Rodgers considers an improvement.

    There will be eight cars on the line, running every two and a half minutes during the busy hours of the day, and less frequently after the rush is over. They are handsome affairs, painted on the outside in black and gold, with compartments on each end for the gripmen, and twenty-five feet long, with a seating capacity of from forty-four to forty-eight people. The cars are finished inside in polished oak, and are handsomely upholstered. They were built by Lewis & Fowler of this city.

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    Brooklyn Heights Runaway

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Tuesday, February 9, 1892. Page 8.

    Note that "brakeman" is used for gripman.

    DOWN THE HILL

    A Cable Car Breaks Away on Montague Street

    It Rolls to the Ferry at a Frightful Rate With a Load of Passengers -- Three Persons Injured and the Conveyances Badly Smashed -- An Obdurate Coachman to Blame, It Is Said.

    An accident that occasioned a great deal of excitement and injured three persons occurred this morning on the Montague street cable road. Car No. 6 was rolling down toward the Wall street ferry house at 9:30 o'clock in charge of B. Jay Raymond, conductor, and Thomas Halliday brakeman, when just at the turn of the hill approaching Montague terrace the brake chain slipped and the vehiclestarted on a bound and jump for the ferry house. Brakeman Halliday blames an obstinate coach driver for the trouble. He says that for several days he has been annoyed by a private coachman who persistently drove down ahead of his car in the morning and doggedly kept in the tracks, thereby obstructing the road. The wicked coachman was at his old tricks this morning. He was taking his employer to the ferry and he drove in ahead of car No. 6 and kept jogging along at a tantalizing rate just in from of the brakeman. Halliday shoulted to him to get out of the way, but the driver refused to clear the track. The cable was rolling in its sheaves at a uniform speed as usual and Halliday saw that when the steep hill was reached he would inevitably smash into the coach with his car. So, in order to avoid an accident he dropped the cable and allowed the car to travel on its own momentum, goverened by the brakes, until the coachman finally pulled out of the tracks. Then Halliday tried to pick up the cable again, but in this he failed and the car began to roll down the hill in a threatening way. He attempted to apply the brakes but they would not work, and then the brakeman saw that there was trouble ahead, but he stuck manfully to his post. The six passengers and the conductor were not by any means comfortable and they huddled together at the far-away end of the car. In the meantime pedestrians were becoming interested in the conveyance and its occupants as it rolled down the hill. At one time it seemed as if the vehicle would jump the tracks and crash into the ferry house, but luckily the wheels kept on the rails. There is a bumper or stop about two feet high across the track at its termination near the ferry and this brought the vehicle to a standstill. But the car struck it with an awful thump which threw the occupants in a heap and sent glass and splinters flying in all directions. It is a wonder that Halliday was not killed, for the inclosure where he stood was shattered. He was thrown violently against the dashboard and he is now sufferring from shock and injuries to his side. William Byrnes, aged 43, of 803 Putnam avenue, recieved a scalp wound, and Edward O'Grady, aged 37, of 135 1/2 Greene avenue, was also cut on the head. There was a woman on the car, Mrs. Eliza Woodruff, of 6 Prospect street, but she escaped without injury.

    Several people ran to the assistance of the passengers when the car stopped, and an ambulance was sent for. Surgeon Miles attended the injured, and they were all able to proceed to their houses. Superintendent Rogers of the railroad company made an investigation, but no arrest was made. The disabled cr was laid up under the arch at Montague terrace, pending its removal to the shop for repair.

    The driver of the coach was identified by the policeman at the ferry as Ferdinand Cobb, who is employed, it is said, by E. F. Knowlton, of 201 Columbia heights. It is said that Cobb has been warned repeatedly about his alleged habit of obstructing the cable cars.

    Mr. E. F. Knowlton was seen by an EAGLE reporter and said:

    "While myself and Mr. Buffum were riding in my coupe down Montague street this morning from the Brooklyn trust company to Wall street ferry, near Hicks street, we passed a car on the down track, which appeared to be unable to proceed from some trouble with the grip and which was being pushed backward toward the hill, under the bridge. We drove by and down the hill, under the bridge, turning out to the right on the side of the track as quick as the width of the street would allow it, looking back all the while, fearing that they would carelessly risk running down the incline with the grip out of order. We soon saw the car coming, apparently beyond the control of the brakeman. It rushed by us and down the hill, the passengers leaping out and being thrown rolling into the dirt. It smashed into the stopping post or obstructions at the foot of the hill. We most fortunately escaped being run over. but is not this road, thus managed, a dangerous affair? Only yesterday we saw a car stopped for similar reasons, but waiting to be aided down the hill by the car following and then held up for repairs. I hope your paper will fairly ventilate the subject.

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    Sudden Stop on Montague Street

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Friday, February 1, 1895. Page 1.

    THROWN THROUGH A WINDOW

    Singular accident on the Montague Street Railroad

    Something unexplained happened at 8:15 o’clock this morning to car No. 5 of the cable line, which runs down Montague street from the city hall to the ferry. The car had just started on its way down the hill toward the hill when it stopped suddenly with a jar which threw all the passengers about like corn in a popper. Herman Beck, aged 15 years, of 188 Van Buren street was standing looking through the glass of the front door at the moment of the accident. He was thrown through the window but escaped with a cut chin.

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    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / x, January 18, 1896. Page 1.

    EXPLOSION IN A CABLE CAR

    EMPLOYE (sic - JT) INJURED AND THE FLOORING BLOWN OUT

    Hugh McCraken, 30 years old, of 231 East Fifty-eighth street, New York, was severely injured early this morning by an explosion in cable car No. 319 of the Broadway line. McCraken was filling the cylinder beneath the car with illuminating gas. In some unknown manner the gas exploded and blew out the cylinder and also a portion of the flooring. McCraken was blown half way to the door of the car, and when he was picked up it ws found that his face, neck and hand s had been badly burned. A fire alarm was turned in, but there were no flames, and the engines returned to their houses.

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    Park Avenue Cable Road Under Construction

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Thursday, January 17, 1887. Page 4.

    Brooklyn's first cable car line did not open in February.

    THE PARK AVENUE CABLE ROAD

    Deacon Richardson Says it Will Be In Operation By Next Month

    The proposed cable road of the Atlantic avenue Railroad Company on Park avenue is nearing completion. On Wednesday two immense Corliss engines will be in position on the corner of Grand and Park avenues and will supply the power for the operation of the road. About a week later the cable cars will have been completed and it will be in operation early in February. Mr. William Richardson, the President of the Atlantic avenue Railroad, has been giving the cable project his personal supervision, and expresses himself as highly gratified with the manner in which the work is progressing. This morning he said to an EAGLE reporter: "The company is now asking the consent of property owners on Fifth avenue with the view of operating its line there by cable power. If we get the necessary consents and the cable road on Park avenue proves satisfactory the system will be introduced generally."

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    Brooklyn Lease Arrangement

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Friday, January 21, 1887. Page 5.

    Tom L Johnson was a politician and street railway executive from Cleveland, Ohio.

    LEASED THE CABLE ROAD

    The Atlantic Railroad Company to Receive 14 Per Cent. Of the Receipts.

    The Atlantic avenue Railroad Company has leased the Park avenue Cable Road to Tom L. Johnson, of Cleveland, and Alexis L. du Pont, of Wilmington, Del. This line is now being constructed, and begins at Washington and Park avenues, and runs through Park avenue, Broadway, Park street, Beaver, Bushwick avenue, Jefferson street and Central avenue to Evergreen Cemetery. Johnson and du Pont were the contractors, and agree to pay the company 14 per cent. of the gross receipts. They have also agreed to have the road finished and in operation March 15, 1887. They will have the use of the company's tracks from Washington Avenue to Fulton Ferry, and will run horse cars thereon until they can build a cable road. The company reserves the right to use these last named tracks for cable cars on the payment of a pro rata of interest on the cost of construction. The lease was signed April 6, but was not filed with the County Clerk until yesterday.

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    From the Brooklyn Standard Union / x, July 1, 1918.

    PROF. CHARLES B. FAIRCHILD

    Prof. Charles Bryant FAICHILD, 76 years old, formerly editor of "The Street Railway Journal" and a veteran of the Civil War, died last Friday at his country home in Williamstown, Mass. His home was at 752 Greene Avenue. He was a professor of mathematics at Brockport Normal School for some years,after which he went to Raleigh, NC, where he operated a large truck farm and organized and became principal of the first graded school in that city. Then he returned to New York and was a teacher in Public School 31 until he became editor of "The Street Railway Journal," which position he held until ten years ago. He is survived by one son, Charles B., Jr., of Philadelphia, and two daughters, Calphurina, of Brooklyn and Mrs. H. WENTWORTH, of Jamestown, NY. The funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon in the chapel at Woodlawn Cemetery.

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    First Street Railroad in Brooklyn (1)

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Sunday, June 3, 1854. Page 3.

    Before it was famous for trolleys, Brooklyn was famous for horsecars.

    The work upon the Court street railroad was suspended for a day or two this week, for want of Iron. On Fulton street, near the ‘ferry, we see that the Company are making arrangements to lay down the track.

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    First Street Railroad in Brooklyn (2)

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Monday, July 3, 1854. Page 2.

    Horace Greeley, editor of the New York Tribune, was an abolitionist, who supported the Free Soil movement in Nebraska.

    The New Railroads in the City -- Trial Trip.

    The Railroad Company placed several of the new cars on the routes on Saturday for a trial trip. The stockholders and a number of other gentlemen were invited to join in the experiment. The cars came down Fulton street about three o’clock in the afternoon, the horses decorated with plumes and the cars shining in all the splendor of a first coat of paint. The young democracy were "tickled to death" at the sight of the new vehicles, and as the cars remained some time at the foot of Fulton street the boys evidently believing in the squatter sovereignity (sic - JT) took possession of the cars as Mr. GREELY’s (sic - JT) troop threatened to do with the soil of Nebraska; The gentlemen present entered the cars and the whole number of vehicles, some six or seven, whirled along through Fulton street and Myrtle avenue as far as the track is laid. It will soon extend to Division avenue where the new plank road to Jamaica commences. The people everywhere seemed to regard the cars with wonder and delight; in fact they exhibited as much animation and excitement in crowding the sidewalks and store doors as if they had never seen anything on wheels before, beyond the structure of a wheelbarrow.

    A smile was on every face, and the babies crowed lustily in the nurses’ arms. The trip established the success of all the arrangements and the adaptation of the cars to the rails. The Company proceeded over the Fulton avenue track, the Court street track, Sands street, &c. In some places the gravel lodged around the rails had not been cleared away sufficiently to make the movement perfectly smooth, but a few runs will remedy all that. Never was any public improvement inaugurated amid a more universal feeling of favor than these railroads. Every citizen regards their introduction, the low fare and superior accommodations with marked approbation; and the entire success of the undertaking, in every point of view, is absolutely certain. Every thing seemed to work in favor of the railroads from their commencement; no injunctions, no delays in procuring materials for the work, no rival interest; nothing was to be encountered that tended to thwart the prosecution of the enterprise. The vigor manifested by the Company, and their punctuality in having the work so far completed at the expected time, affords the proof that the interests of the community will never suffer in their hands.

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    Last Cable Cars on Broadway

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Sunday, May 19, 1901. Page 4.

    Cable operation on Broadway lasted into the Twentieth Century.

    THE TROLLEY ON BROADWAY

    To Be Operated in Manhattan in a Week

    The last cable car will be run on the Broadway line, Manhattan, on Saturday nght next, and the whole Metropolitan system will be then operated by electricity. It was thought that the cable would be cut last night, but, owing to a delay in the perfection of the plans, the work had to be postponed for a week. The Lexington avenue road changed from cable to electricity two weeks ago and the Columbus avenue one week ago.

    The work on the Broadway line has been going on for some time and the officials of the Metropolitan fear no serious suspension of traffic after the cutting of the cables. They say that all the cars will be operated by electricity on the following Monday morning. At the offices of the Metropolitan Traction Company it was Said that possibly horse cars would be run over the Broadway line to Fifty-ninth street while the work of adjusting the electric wire was going on. This, however, has not been definitely decided upon.

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    Brooklyn Eagle 15-Aug-1902, page 1 bh19020815 Mishap on Montague Street

    BATH OF RED PAINT

    Basis of a Damage Suit for $1,700 Instituted by Miss May Against W. J. Cockle.

    Miss Lauretta V. May is suing William J. Cockle, a real estate dealer at 164 Montague street, in the Supreme Court, for $1,700 damages and the basis of her suit is an alleged bath of red paint which the fair plaintiff says she received on June 4 last and to which the defendant contributed because of his runaway horse. Miss May says she was damaged $200 to her clothing, $500 injuries done her hair and skin and that the nervous shock, ridicule and embarrassment caused a further injury of $1,000.

    According to the story disclosed by the papers Miss May was walking along Montague street on the day of the accident when she heard the noise of a running horse. Looking about she saw that the animal had been frightened by a cable car, and, attached to a wagon, he had taken to the sidewalk and was coming her way. She quickly withdrew to one side but the flying heels of the runaway came in contact with a pot of red paint standing on the sidewalk and it rained a deep carmine upon the plaintiff. It ruined her dress and hat and caused her cheeks to blush vermillion. Miss May says that the accident caused her much mortification and mental distress.

    The case was sent to a Sheriff’s jury by Justice Dickey late yesterday afternoon and the damages, if any, will be assessed by a panel of jurors drawn by Sheriff Dike.


    "A Trip Down Market Street" World Premiere?

    From the San Francisco Call / Saturday, April 20, 1907. Page 9.

    MARKET STREET VIEWS STIR ORPHEUM PATRONS

    Record-Breaking Applause and Tears Are Caused by Kinetoscope

    A view of Market street before the fire, from the front of a cable car traveling from Castro street to the ferries, was shown by the moving picture machine at the Orpheum theater Thursday night and won the greatest applause that the Orpheum has known since its reopening, the enthusiasm being mingled with tears of many in the audience who knew and loved the busy thoroughfare depicted on the screen before them.

    The picture was presented during the intermission in the middle of the performance, and was intended merely as a special feature in recognition of the anniversary of the fire. But while hearty cheers greeted the familiar scenes as they followed one after the other, the pathos of the ravages of the great fire touched many hearts and there were tears in the eyes of scores of onlookers.

    Every well known building and corner shown in the moving picture won applause, but the Palace hotel, the Sutter street horsecar seen crossing the city's main artery at the Sutter junction and the final view up Market street were greeted with outbursts of hand clapping which broke the Orpheum record for plaudits.

    The film for the picture was taken just prior to the fire and had never been shown before. It was intended to use it only once, Thursday night, but the demands made yesterday for a repetition caused the managers of the theater to decide to continue the picture at every performance this week and next.

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    "A Trip Down Market Street" World Premiere?

    From the San Francisco Call / x, April 20, 1907. Page 9.

    MARKET STREET VIEWS STIR ORPHEUM PATRONS

    Record-Breaking Applause and Tears Are Caused by Kinetoscope

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    "A Trip Down Market Street" World Premiere?

    From the San Francisco Call / x, April 20, 1907. Page 9.

    MARKET STREET VIEWS STIR ORPHEUM PATRONS

    Record-Breaking Applause and Tears Are Caused by Kinetoscope

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    "A Trip Down Market Street" World Premiere?

    From the San Francisco Call / x, April 20, 1907. Page 9.

    MARKET STREET VIEWS STIR ORPHEUM PATRONS

    Record-Breaking Applause and Tears Are Caused by Kinetoscope

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    "A Trip Down Market Street" World Premiere?

    From the San Francisco Call / x, April 20, 1907. Page 9.

    MARKET STREET VIEWS STIR ORPHEUM PATRONS

    Record-Breaking Applause and Tears Are Caused by Kinetoscope

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    Name For a Cable Car Operator

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / x, April 11, 1887. Page 4.

    Current Events

    They call an engineer on a cable car in San Francisco Agrippa.

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    Third Avenue Car Hits Wagon

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / x, February 4, 1898. Page 1.

    CABLE CAR CRUSHES WAGON

    Two Men Injured on Third Avenue, Manhattan -- Road Blocked for Miles

    A southbound Third avenue cable car ran into a team and wagon of the Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, 49 Lafayette place, this morning at Twenty-eighth street, Manhattan. The wagon was smashed to pieces and the car was badly damaged, every window in it being broken. The gripman of the cable car, John Moran, had his right hand broken. The driver of the wagon, Hugh McCleary, was thrown off but was uninjured. The only other person injured was Arthu White of 321 East Thirty-Fifth street, who was trying to clear the street after the accident. Part of the wagon fell on him, breaking his leg. He was removed to Bellevue Hospital.

    The driver of the wagon was crossing Twenty-eighth street when the accident occurred. The gripman had his hand on the brake and was slowing up, but the horse attached to twagon lurched and the car struck the wagon, driving it against the pillar of the elevated road.

    Gripman Moran tried to put on the brake suddenly. He would have been able to stop the car but the read of the wagon struck the hand with which he held the brake and crushed it. The car crashed the wagon against the elevated pillar and made kindling wood of it. Every window in the car was broken, its side was broken and the passengers were thrown to the floor by the shock. There were about a dozen passengers in the car, half of them women. All were flung to the floor and the women shreiked with terror. Some of the men tried to get out of the car. The driver of the wagon was pitched to the street by the shock, but he was picked up and found to be all right. The motorman could not extricate himself from the broken dashboard and door of the car, which pinned him down and was taken out by the police.

    The excitement among the passengers was quited after a time and they left the car. None of the passengers was injured. The road was blocked, and in tearing apart the wagon to remove it, White was knocked down and his leg fractured. He was removed to Bellevue Hospital. Moran had his hand attended by an ambulance surgeon and then went home.

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    Strike in Saint Paul

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Monday, October 27, 1893. Page 12.

    ST. PAUL'S STREET CAR STRIKE.

    St. Paul, Minn., October 27 -- The street car situation remains about the same. No attempt has been made to run cars on any of the lines, with the exception of the Silby ("Selby" - JT) avenue cable line and the Interurban electric line to Minneapolis. The latter carries the United States mails. It has been kept running under police protection. The company claim that the cars will be running as usual to-morrow morning, but the statement is not credited. The men have not yet decided to order a general strike and the situation still remains a lockout.

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    Last Cable Cars on Broadway/2

    From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle / Sunday, May 26, 1901. Page 10.

    Cables replaced by conduit electrics.

    NO CARS ON BROADWAY

    Work of Removing the Cable Began at 8:30 Last Night -- Traffic Stops Until Tuesday

    Shortly before 9 o'clock last night workmen began the work of substituting electricity for cable power on the Broadway car lines. With the removal of the cable from Broadway the entire system of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company will be operated by electricity.

    The work of changing the motive power on the cable line was started four weeks ago, when the cable was removed from Lexington avenue. A week later the cable was removed from Columbus avenue, and for the past two weeks the cable line has extended only from Fifty-ninth street to the Battery.

    The work of substituting the motive power has been going on for many months. Owing to the character of the work involved, the engineers have been extremely careful in having every detail worked out before stopping traffic. They expect that the entire line will be opened by Tuesday, but in the meantime they hope to operate the road as each section is completed.

    According to the engineers in charge of the work there are under the road nearly five thousand moving parts, all of which must be taken out in pieces. Besides there are 3,500 sheave wheels on which the cables rested and which will be taken out through the various manholes.

    Before the electric current can be turned on more than 200 connections will have to be made, 8,000 plugs removed, and about 40,000 bolts set. one of this work can be done, however, until the cable has been removed.

    The last car that carried passengers on the lower section of Broadway left Houston street shortly after 8 o'clock and the Battery at 8:27 o'clock. Starter Thomas Doyle, instead of giving the signal to start the car with his whistle, discharged a revolver. The car contained sixteen passengers.

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    Excerpts from San Francisco and Thereabout by Charles Keeler

    Charles Keeler's book San Francisco and Thereabout was published in 1902 by "The California Promotion Committee of San Francisco". The full text is available at San Francisco Genealogy.

    VIGNETTES OF CITY STREETS

    Oh the bewilderment of a first view of a big hustling American city! To be dropped off the ferry into the very center of the maelstrom of life, where every mortal is bent upon his own task, where streams and counterstreams of humanity hurry in and out and round about, and all seem at first glance like the chaos of life. After the repose of the country, the wide serenity of the hill-encircled bay, to grapple with the noise and stir of the city! But what a sensation of exhilaration, this elbowing with the eager crowd, this trotting with the pack after the quarry, this pressing on with the tumult of men in the rush for place! Here life and effort are focused, and the great organic forces of the State are centralized and defined. The wheels of the Juggernaut Progress roll along the street and their victims are many, but the victories of peace atone for all the strife, and humanity goes its way, cursing and praying, weeping and singing, fighting and loving, but on the whole advancing from the beast to the angel.

    At the foot of Market Street the long low Ferry Building of gray Colusa stone commands the view, and its graceful clock-tower rises above the commotion of the city highways. To right and left stretches the waterfront street, where big docks and wharfs are lined with shipping. Heavy freight vans rattle and bang over the cobble-stones. Bells are clanging on cable cars, newsboys are piping the sensation of the hour; there is an undertone of many voices, a scuffling of hundreds of feet on the cement walks, a hurrying of the crowd for first place on the cars. From this point of vantage one might parody the well-known lines of Tennyson into:
    Cars to right of you,
    Cars to left of you,
    Cars in front of your clatter and rumble.

    The Market Street cable cars bear the most bewilderingly diverse inscriptions. No two seem alike, yet all roll merrily up the same broad highway. The novice soon discovers that for all practical purposes one is as good as another unless his journey be into the higher residence portions of the city, and he furthermore learns that by a most extensive system of transfers he can keep traveling almost ad lib for one five-cent fare, journeying thus from the bay to the ocean. There is a great parade of cars in front of the Ferry Building. The red and green cable cars of the Washington and Jackson districts come sweeping around a loop out of a side street with clanging bells and a watchman preceeding them. Beyond their stand are electric and horse cars, all off to the right of Market, while to the left several important south-of-Market electric systems start. Here are the fine big cars that run down the peninsula to San Mateo, as well as the Mission and Harrison Street lines.

    About the only distinctive feature in the laying out of San Francisco's streets which relieves the prevailing prosaic checkerboard system of American cities, is found in the direction of Market Street which slants boldly across the center of the town. The streets to the north of it were stupidly laid out on the points of the compass, up hill and down dale, but a direct route from the mission to the bay following down the valley, was a matter of so much importance in the early days that this highway was perpetuated in the permanent scheme for the city. The streets of the section south of Market are parallel or at right angles to that thoroughfare, while the district to the north is laid out in streets which run on other lines, making gore blocks at every intersection with Market.

    Nearly everyone seems bound up Market Street, either a-foot or a-cable, so why not follow the crowd? Cars of many colors are swinging around on the turn-table one after another, and the man in the house of glass, who I trust never throws stones, is giving them the cue for starting up town. A big underground gong is clanging its warning as the cars swoop upon the turn-table; bells are jangled at the imperturbable crowd, and in some mysterious way people manage to escape being run over.

    Jumping on the first car to start, I find an outside seat on the dummy. The bell rings, the gripman throws back his lever which clutches the cable. You can hear the grip work amid the rumble of the start. He hammers away at his foot gong and off we roll! There is a rush of wind down the street, a whirl and confusion of traffic. Wholesale houses and office buildings line the way, mostly landmarks of the old regime with much gingerbread ornamentation, but here and there a fine modern building of stone or terra cotta shows that the city is alive and growing. There is time for but a glance up the streets that shoot off from Market at an acute angle; California, Pine, Bush, are passed in a trice and the corner is reached where Post and Montgomery impinge upon Market. The fine Crocker Building is squeezed in on the gore block between Post and Market while across the way on the south side of Market a whole block is taken up with the Palace Hotel--a monument of bay windows. A sort of Bridge of Sighs crosses New Montgomery connecting the Palace with the Grand Hotel. On the northeast corner of Market and Montgomery Streets, a modern terra-cotta office building is occupied by the business departments of the Southern Pacific Company. Up Montgomery Street, past the Lick House and the Occidental Hotel, both in the architecture of two or three decades ago, is the magnificent Mills Building, one of the most substantial and well proportioned structures of the City. Another massive edifice of fine design is the Hayward Building, a block behond the Mills Building, but the clanging car is rolling up the street and there is no time to itemize the many modern buildings which are daily climbing up on steel frames from the noisy city pave.

    Another block of navigating the grip and the coign of observation, the navel of San Francisco is reached. It is the corner of Third, Kearny, and Geary Streets, where the busy life of the city centers. So many people leave the car at this point that 'tis evident there is something doing, and meekly enough I fall in line with the crowd. The three morning papers seek companionship upon the corners here--the Chronicle, whose building is of red sandstone and brick, with its clock tower--a well-known landmark of the city; the Examiner Building, in Spanish style, with simple plaster walls, deep recessed portico at the top, and tile roof; and the Call tower, rising fifteen stories to a fine dome, the most commanding architectural feature of the business district. At this meeting of the ways is Lotta's drinking fountain, a token of which San Franciscans are fond from its association with the soubrette who, in early days, first made fame and fortune here by winning the hearts of the pioneers.

    Kearny Street is the highway for shopping, and hosts of fair ladies trip its stony pavements, looking with absorbed attention at window displays of silks and laces, coats and curtains, or casting glances at the latest walking exponent of fads and fashions. Some are lured by the fragrant aroma or tempting window exhibition into the sanctuary of ices and candies; others succumb to the florist, and thus money circulates by the caprice of feminine fancy.

    At the Kearny Street corner, right in the shadow of the Chronicle Building, is a bright and attractive feature of the city streets--the flower sellers. They are ranged in a long row on the curb, men and boys standing beside their baskets and holding out bouquets to tempt the wayfarers. The busy stream of humanity sweeps by with fluttering skirts and laughing voices. Electric cars clang up and down, a coachman snaps his whip as a glistening carriage with jingling harness rolls over the asphalt pavement and the horse's hoofs clatter merrily. It is a democratic procession--the negro with his pipe, the traveler with dress-suit case, an officer just returned from the Philippines, and above all, the women, over whom even Rudyard Kipling, with cynic eye and caustic pen, could not but indulge in rhapsodies. Mid all the din and grit of the city, alike in winter as in summer, the flower sellers are at their post, and the perfume of the violet, the sweet-pea and the rose, or whatever may be the flower of the season, steals upon the senses, while the brilliant array of bloom makes an oasis in the desert of stone.

    San Francisco is commonly divided into north and south of Market Street. In the early days of the city the aristocratic part of town was in Happy Valley and on Rincon Hill, to the south, but when a citizen, Mr. A.S. Hallidie, successfully solved the problem of climbing the steep hills north of Market by inventing the cable car, people flocked to the heights commanding a view of the bay and the Golden Gate. Then it was that California Street became the nob hill where palaces of ample dimensions were built by the Stanfords, Hopkins, Crockers, Floods and other millionaires, while people of more moderate means settled upon the adjacent hills and slopes. The south of Market section became the home of the artisans for the most part, and certain cross streets, notably Third, Sixth and Eighth, have developed into secondary shopping centers. Mission Street, the first thoroughfare south of Market, is becoming the great wholesale street of the city, and numbers of splendid modern structures, solid, substantial, and simple in design, are being constructed upon it.

    The residence district is today reaching out over the hills between the Presidio and Golden Gate Park, while the business section, once crowded down on the made land of the waterfront, is expanding up the residence streets, especially on Geary, Post and Sutter. Post Street is to me one of the most attractive shopping highways, owing to the number of artistic stores which have of late years been established there. The idea, which originated with a picture dealer who commenced in a very modest way, has grown with surprising rapidity. Book stores, bazaars where Oriental brasses and rugs are displayed, collections of artistic photographs, Japanese embroidery and prints, Egyptian embroidery, jewelry, carved and antique furniture are among the displays noted in passing the shop windows. I know of no other American city, not excepting Boston and New York, where on may find the equal in taste and refinement of some of these stores.

    To go into a picture house where every detail of furniture, from the carved chairs and simple tables to the lockers with big brass strap hinges, are works of art, studiously harmonious, where wall decoration is considered as well as the pictures selected with so much taste to adorn them--surely this is as inspiring as it is unusual! Then to be led into mysterious back rooms, reserved for sequesrating choice collections of oil paintings, displayed with more generous wall space than any art gallery affords, and other rooms lined with soft Japanese grass-cloth for showing watercolors and etchings! Verily it is enough to surprise the tenderfoot who thinks of San Francisco as the metropolis of the wild and woolly west, where whiskered men in top boots and flannel shirts carry six-shooters in their belts. Some people have slipped a half-centurey cog in picturing California from the other side of the continent. Culture and art have taken on a new lease of life here, and like the exuberant vegetation are already bearing the fruit of the Hesperides. Let us frankly confess that it is to be found only in spots, like oases in a desert of the commonplace, but every wind that blows is scattering broadcast the seeds.

    Where but in San Francisco can one find a bookstore like an aesthetic library? Here are books in glass cases, books upon finely designed tables, and, scattered about the room, exquisite antiques in brass and bronze, choice vases and bits of pottery, with a few well chosen photographs and cards on the walls. Other rooms adjoin the main apartment--the old book room where many quaint and curious books in rare bindings are treasured, the children's room and the old furniture room with its quaint fireplace. Another bookseller on the same street, a man of years' experience and standing, has gone extensively into the publication of books by San Francisco authors, and the works which bear his imprint will compare with the output of the best Eastern houses in workmanship and style.

    Many cable cars go into the residence district on the heights. We may travel on the California Street cars through the business quarter, even more exclusively the haunt of men than Kearny Street is of women, and up the steep ascent past the Hopkins Art School, looking backward down the street to the bay with the Berkeley Hills and Mount Diablo beyond; or we may be hauled up Clay Street through Chinatown, holding on to our seats the while as best we may to prevent sliding down upon our neighbor, and ultimately get up into the Western Addition out on Jackson Street or Pacific Avenue. There are countless blocks of the older residence portion of the city to be passed en route, built up of painted board houses out of which rows of bay windows bulge vacantly, ornamented with diverse whimsicalities that are as meaningless as they are wearisome. But the cable car jogs on up the hills and down the valleys. An occasional dracaena flutters its ribbon leaves, or a eucalyptus sways its stiff hanging foliage in the fresh sea breeze. Then, as we climb, the vista to the north discloses the blue water of the bay with the purple flanking hills of Tamalpais upon the farther shore. Up steep cobble-stone streets ascends the car, with isolated knobs to the north and northeast--Russian and Telegraph Hills, crowned with buildings. Straight ahead, oceanwards, are more hills up which a series of cars may be seen moving at measured intervals.

    Van Ness Avenue is crossed--a broad asphalt street lined with costly homes and large church edifices. Many of the houses are truly palatial in size and style, and an air of wealth pervades the thoroughfare. On clatters the car, rumbling over a crossing and starting up another streep ascent. Here stands an elegant mansion of rough red sandstone, with tile roof, there a quaint brick house with the distinctive features of the Renaissance in domestic architecture. Down the side streets on the lower hills, the city roofs crowd in a gray mass.

    Just off from Jackson Street is a simple little brick chruch which has been an inspiration to a growing number of lovers of the genuine and beautiful in life. It matters not whether they are Swedenborgians as the minister of the church happens to be, or have other creedal affiliations. The spirit of the place, with all its quiet restfulness, its homelike charm, its naive grace, has sunk deep in the lives of a small but earnest group of men and women. Within, the stranger is impressed with a certain primitive quality about everything. The heavy madroño trunk rafters left in their natural state, the big open fireplace, the massive square-post, rush-bottom chairs, and the large, grave allegorical landscapes of seedtime and harvest, painted with loving care by William Keith, combine with the simplicity of design and the fitness of every detail, to make a church, which, without any straining after effect, is unique in beauty. The message of its builder has reached his mark, and here and there through city and town, homes have been reared in the same simple fashion--plain, straightforward, genuine homes, covered with unpainted shingles, or built of rough brick, with much natural redwood inside, in broad unvarnished panels. The same reserve which has characterized the building of these homes has likewise been exercised in their furnishing. A few antique rugs, a few good pictures or photographs of the masters, and many good books, with plain tables and chairs, constitute the furniture. To find this spirit, which would have been a delight to William Morris, so strongly rooted as to assume almost the aspect of a cult, is, I take it, one of the most remarkable features of a civilization so new as that of modern San Francisco.

    For a bird's-eye view of the city, no point of vantage is more commanding than the summit of Telegraph Hill. An electric car out Kearny Street goes past the base of the hill, but the height must be gained on foot. Just where Kearny Street leads into Broadway, in that tatterdemalion Latin quarter where Mexican and Italian restaurants crowd about the old jail, and the window of every two-penny shop has a name inherited from Spain or Italy, we leave the car and climb the steep road. Many of the side streets are passable only for pedestrians. Flights of steps or broad chicken-ladders lead to houses perched on rocky heights. It is a famous place for goats, which graze on old newspaper and shavings, looking at you the while with wistful expressions on their bearded countenances.

    Panting, we reach the summit and gaze abroad for the first impression. What a view is spread about within the wide sweep of horizon--of life with all its varied activities--commerce, manufactures, homes! It is like sitting down with a whole metropolis wriggling under the microscope! The great frame barn-like dilapidated castle interrupts a portion of the view to northward, but otherwise the whole varied panorama can be taken in by a turn of the head. To the east and northeast, lies the expanse of blue water bounded by the far-away green hills of the Contra Costa shore, rising gradually to the highest point in Grizzly Peak of the Berkeley Range. Goat Island, a green mound in the center of the bay, is humped up in front of Berkeley. To the south of it, Oakland lines the bay shore.

    Around northwestwardly stands the Bolinas Ridge, with the waters of the Golden Gate at its base. Fort Point protrudes on the south, with Point Bonita beyond it on the north shore, and still farther off, just a glimpse of the glistening blue ocean. So much for the bay view which curves around the marvelous panorama of the city! At the wharves is a fringe of shipping. Men and horses move about the docks like black pygmies. The rumble of vans ascends from the cobble-stone pavement, and the explosive puffs of a gasoline engine are heard.

    But the city, oh the city, how it crowds the hills with a wilderness of gray walls and windows, cleft here and there by the lines of parallel streets which dare to climb the most forbidding heights! How it is spread out there on the slopes, with lofty tower buildings rising from the plain, and a line of pale hills fading beyond into purple behind a veil of smoke! Near at hand, in front of the Greek church, with its green, copper-capped turret, is a little patch of grass. Beyond it, on Russian Hill, are some artistic homes with a bit of shrubbery on the adjacent hillslope. Clothes are hanging out to dry on flat roofs far below. The clang and din filters up from the plain in subdues tones, with the shrill voices of children caught by a veering gust of wind. What a chaos of dull houses, thrilling with life, each enclosing its family history, its triumph or tragedy, but all so immovable and unindividual as I look upon the mass!

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    Excerpts from Blix by Frank Norris

    Frank Norris' novel, Blix, is a love story, which bears little resemblance to his other novels. In these excerpts, an anonymous cable car line and a Union Street train of the Presidio and Ferries Railway are important parts of the scene.


    Chapter III

    Just then his eye was caught by a familiar figure in trim, well-fitting black halted on the opposite corner waiting for the passage of a cable car. It was Travis Bessemer. No one but she could carry off such rigorous simplicity in the matter of dress so well: black skirt, black Russian blouse, tiny black bonnet and black veil, white kids with black stitching. Simplicity itself. Yet the style of her, as Condy Rivers told himself, flew up and hit you in the face; and her figure--was there anything more perfect? and the soft pretty effect of her yellow hair seen through the veil--could anything be more fetching? and her smart carriage and the fling of her fine broad shoulders, and--no, it was no use; Condy had to run down to speak to her.

    Chapter IX

    The old-fashioned Union Street cable car, with its low, comfortable outside seats, put Blix and Condy down just inside the Presidio Government Reservation. Condy asked a direction of a sentry nursing his Krag-Jorgensen at the terminus of the track, and then with Blix set off down the long board walk through the tunnel of overhanging evergreens.


    Frank Norris's Blix was published in 1899. The full text is available at On-Line Books.

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    Excerpt from Chapter 22 of White Fang by Jack London

    Jack London's novel White Fang is an adventure story set in the Alaskan Gold Rush.


    White Fang landed from the steamer in San Francisco. He was appalled. Deep in him, below any reasoning process or act of consciousness, he had associated power with god-head. And never had the white men seemed such marvelous gods as now, when he trod the slimy pavement of San Francisco. The log cabins he had known were replaced by towering buildings. The streets were crowded with perils-wagons, carts, automobiles; great, straining horses pulling huge trucks; and monstrous cable and electric cars hooting and clanging through the midst, screeching their insistent menace after the manner of the lynxes he had known in the northern woods.


    Jack London's White Fang was published in 19xx. The full text is available at Bibliomania.

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    Excerpt From "Their Silver Wedding Journey" by William Dean Howells

    Harper's new monthly magazine. Volume 98, Issue 585, February 1899

    With the three hundred dollars he had got for his book, less the price of his passage, changed into German bank-notes and gold pieces, and safely buttoned in the breast pocket of his waistcoat, he felt as safe from pillage as from poverty when he came out from buying his ticket; he covertly pressed his arm against his breast from time to time, for the joy of feeling his money there and not from any fear of finding it gone. He wanted to sing, he wanted to dance; he could not believe it was he, as he rode up the lonely length of Broadway in the cable-car, between the wild irregular walls of the canyon which the cable-cars have all to themselves at the end of a summer afternoon. He went and dined, and he thought he dined well, at a Spanish-American restaurant, for fifty cents, with a half-bottle of California claret included. When he came back to Broadway he was aware that it was stiflingly hot in the pinkish twilight, but he took a cable-car again in lack of other pastime, and the motion served the purpose of a breeze, which he made the most of by keeping his hat off. It did not really matter to him whether it was hot or cool; he was imparadised in weather which had nothing to do with the temperature.

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    Feinstein, Dianne

    Senator Feinstein Senator Dianne Feinstein.

    Dianne Feinstein was mayor of San Francisco during the Great Reconstruction of 1983-84.

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    Gillham, Robert

    Robert Gillham was born in 1854 in New York. Trained as an engineer, Gillham moved to Kansas City in 1878. He proposed a cable railway to connect Union Depot with Quality Hill. The Kansas City Cable Railway's Ninth Street incline became a city landmark. Gillham later built the Eighth Street Tunnel of the Interstate Consolidated Rapid Transit Company. In 1891, Gillham designed the Brooklyn Heights Railroad. Gillham also organized and served as chief engineer of many railways, street and mainline. He built the Kansas City, Pittsburgh, and Gulf Railroad and served as its general manager. Robert Gillham died of pneumonia in 1899.

    The Kansas City Public Library has an article about Robert Gillham.

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    Wells Fargo 150
    Wells Fargo - 150 Years

    18-Mar-2002 marks the 150th anniversary of Wells Fargo
    Wells Fargo 150


    Sutter St train
    Sutter Street - 125 Years

    27-Jan-2002 marks the 125th anniversary of cable traction on the Sutter Street Railway. Visit the San Francisco Cable Car Museum site for Walter Rice's article "Celebrating 125th Anniversary of San Francisco's Second Cable Car, The Sutter Street Railroad - History & Technology".
    Sutter St train


    Santa
    Happy Holidays

    Do you remember when Santa arrived at the Emporium by cable car? Read Joe Lacey's Christmas on the Cables to find out more.
    Santa


    Grand Union Flag
    London Can Take It

    I offer my respect to the brave people of London who defied the attacks of terrorists and carried on with their lives after the bombings on July 7, 2005. I offer my sympathy to the families of those who were killed or injured. I remember the words of Winston Churchill during another time of terror: "London Can Take It".
    Grand Union Flag



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